Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Repeated measurement of habitual food intake increases under-reporting and induces selective under-reporting

  • Annelies H. C. Goris (a1), Erwin P. Meijer (a1) and Klaas R. Westerterp (a1)
Abstract

The aim of the current study was to measure differences in reporting behaviour between a first occasion of 7 d food recording and a second occasion of 7 d food recording 12 weeks later, in a group of elderly men (n 17) and women (n 17). Half the group followed an exercise intervention. The mean age was 61 (SD 5) YEARS AND MEAN BMI WAS 26.2 (sd 3.8) kg/m2. Reported energy intake was compared with energy expenditure as calculated from measured BMR and physical activity assessed with a tri-axial accelerometer for movement registration. Total under-reporting was divided into undereating and under-recording. Undereating was calculated from the change in body mass over the recording week and the under-recording was measured using the water balance technique. In the first period, the total under-reporting was 21 % and increased to 27 % in the second period (P=0.03). In the first period there was no indication for subjects eating less during the recording week, however, in the second period subjects lost body mass during the food recording indicating undereating. The amount of under-recording was calculated at 21 % in the first period and 18 % in the second period of recording (P 0.28). During the second period subjects selectively under-reported their fat intake and over-reported their protein intake. In conclusion, repeated assessment of food intake caused a higher quantitative and a qualitative under-reporting of food intake. The effect of interventions (dietary or otherwise) on habitual food intake might be confounded by changes in food-reporting behaviour.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Repeated measurement of habitual food intake increases under-reporting and induces selective under-reporting
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Repeated measurement of habitual food intake increases under-reporting and induces selective under-reporting
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Repeated measurement of habitual food intake increases under-reporting and induces selective under-reporting
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Annelies H. C. Goris, fax + 31 43 3670976, email annelies.goris@philips.com
References
Hide All
Bandini, LG, Schoeller, DA, Cyr, HN & Dietz, WH (1990) Validity of reported energy intake in obese and nonobese adolescents. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 52, 421425.
Bouten, C, Verboeket-van de Venne, W, Westerterp, K, Verduin, M & Janssen, J (1996) Daily physical activity assessment: comparison between movement registration and doubly labeled water. Journal of Applied Physiology 81, 10191026.
Fjeld, CR, Brown, KH & Schoeller, DA (1988) Validation of the deuterium oxide method for measuring average daily milk intake in infants. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 48, 671679.
Goris, AHC, Meijer, EP, Kester, A & Westerterp, KR (2001) The use of a tri-axial accelerometer for the validity of reported food intake. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (In the Press).
Goris, AHC & Westerterp, KR (1999) Underreporting of habitual food explained by undereating in motivated lean women. Journal of Nutrition 129, 878882.
Goris, AHC & Westerterp, KR (2000) Improved reporting of habitual food intake after confrontation with earlier results on food reporting. British Journal of Nutrition 83, 363369.
Goris, AHC, Westerterp-Plantenga, MS & Westerterp, KR (2000) Undereating and underrecording of habitual food intake in obese men; selective underreporting of fat intake. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 71, 130134.
Johansson, G, Callmer, E & Gustafsson, J-A (1992) Validity of repeated dietary measurements in a dietary intervention study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 46, 717728.
Johnson, RK, Goran, MI & Poehlman, ET (1994) Correlates of over- and underreporting of energy intake in healthy older men and women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 59, 12861290.
Kristal, AR, Andrilla, HA, Koepsell, TD, Diehr, PH & Cheadle, A (1998) Dietary assessment instruments are susceptible to intervention-associated response set bias. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 98, 4043.
Schaefer, E, Augustin, J, Schaefer, M, Rasmussen, H, Ordovas, J & Dallal, G (2000) Lack of efficacy of a food-frequency questionnaire in assessing dietary macronutrient intakes in subjects consuming diets of known composition. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 71, 746751.
Schoeller, DA (1990) How accurate is self-reported dietary energy intake? Nutrition Reviews 48, 373379.
Schoffelen, PFM, Westerterp, KR, Saris, WHM & Hoor ten, F (1997) A dual-respiration chamber system with automated calibration. Journal of Applied Physiology 83, 20642072.
Tomoyasu, N, Toth, M & Poehlman, E (2000) Misreporting of total energy intake in older African Americans. International Journal of Obesity 24, 2026.
Weir, JB (1949) New methods for calculating metabolic rate with special reference to protein metabolism. Journal of Physiology 109, 19.
Westerterp, K, Verboeket-van de Venne, W, Meijer, G & Hoor ten, F (1991) Self-reported intake as a measure for energy intake. A validation against doubly labelled water. Obesity Europe 91, 1722.
Westerterp, KR, Donkers, JH, Fredrix, EW & Boekhoudt, P (1995) Energy intake, physical activity and body weight: a simulation model. British Journal of Nutrition 73, 337347.
Westerterp, KR, Kayser, B, Brouns, F, Herry, JP & Saris, WH (1992) Energy expenditure climbing Mt. Everest. Journal of Applied Physiology 73, 18151819.
Westerterp, KR, Robach, P, Wouters, L & Richalet, JP (1996) Water balance and acute mountain sickness before and after arrival at high altitude of 4,350 m. Journal of Applied Physiology 80, 19681972.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed