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Ten years after the stroke: Me talk slightly less funny

A linguist talks about his recovery and newly found mission in life

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2018

Extract

It is now ten years since I suffered a stroke. I continue to improve, albeit much more slowly than in the first one or two years. Readers of English Today may remember (Schwyter, 2011) that I was head of the English Department at the University of Lausanne, and a graduate of both the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Cambridge. My stroke came really out of the blue; I did not have any of the early warning signs. And the only possible risk factors I was aware of were very long working hours and stress in all its forms – though ‘stress’ is not very well defined medically, being not one symptom but rather a cluster of symptoms (Kivimäki et al., 2015).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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References

Gitterman, M. R., Goral, M. & Obler, L. K. 2012. Aspects of Multilingual Aphasia. Communication Disorders across Languages. Bristol, Buffalo and Toronto: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
Kesselring, J. 2015. ‘Das flexible Gehirn’. Swiss Archives of Neurology and Psychiatry, 166(8), 263268.Google Scholar
Kesselring, J. 2016. ‘Le cerveau flexible’. Le Cerveau 1/2016, 67.Google Scholar
Kivimäki, M. et al. 2015. ‘Long Working Hours and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease and Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Published and Unpublished Data for 603 838 Individuals’. The Lancet. Online at <http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60295-1> (Accessed August 28, 2017).>CrossRef+(Accessed+August+28,+2017).>Google Scholar
Schwyter, J. R. 2011. ‘“Me talk funny”: A stroke patient's personal account’. English Today, 27(4), 4952.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schwyter, J. R. 2013. ‘Multilingualism in Stroke Patients: A Personal Account’. International Journal of English Linguistics, 3(3), 1522.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schwyter, J. R. 2016. Dictating to the Mob: The History of the BBC Advisory Committee on Spoken English. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar

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