Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-rpbls Total loading time: 0.324 Render date: 2022-06-26T02:29:00.798Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Daily life stress reactivity in remitted versus non-remitted depressed individuals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 April 2020

M. van Winkel*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, South Limburg Mental Health Research and Teaching Network, EURON, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200MDMaastricht, The Netherlands GGzE, Institute of Mental Health Care Eindhoven and the Kempen, The Netherlands
N.A. Nicolson
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, South Limburg Mental Health Research and Teaching Network, EURON, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200MDMaastricht, The Netherlands
M. Wichers
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, South Limburg Mental Health Research and Teaching Network, EURON, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200MDMaastricht, The Netherlands
W. Viechtbauer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, South Limburg Mental Health Research and Teaching Network, EURON, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200MDMaastricht, The Netherlands
I. Myin-Germeys
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, South Limburg Mental Health Research and Teaching Network, EURON, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200MDMaastricht, The Netherlands
F. Peeters
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, South Limburg Mental Health Research and Teaching Network, EURON, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200MDMaastricht, The Netherlands
*
*Corresponding author. Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, South Limburg Mental Health Research and Teaching Network, EURON, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands. Tel.: +0031 433299631. E-mail address:mark.vanwinkel@maastrichtuniversity.nl (M. van Winkel).
Get access

Abstract

Background:

Little is known about how daily life mood reactivity to minor stressors (stress reactivity) might change following major depressive disorder (MDD) treatment. We investigate whether (i) mood states and appraisals of daily stressors change after treatment; (ii) stress reactivity to event, activity, or social stress differs; (iii) stress reactivity depends on severity of residual depressive symptoms; and (iv) stress reactivity in individuals with remitted or non-remitted depression differ from that of never-depressed individuals.

Methods:

Thirty depressed individuals participated in an experience sampling study before and after a treatment period of 18 months; 39 healthy individuals formed a comparison group. Reactivity of positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) to daily stressors were measured.

Results:

More residual symptoms were associated with larger NA responses to stress. Compared to healthy controls, participants with non-remitted MDD showed higher NA-reactivity to all stressors. In contrast, stress reactivity to event and activity stressors was normalized in remitted patients. However, they still showed heightened NA-reactivity to social stress.

Conclusions:

Greater stress reactivity to event and activity stress appears to be state-dependent. The heightened social stress reactivity in remitted patients suggests that sensitivity to social stress may reflect an underlying vulnerability in MDD.

Type
Original article
Copyright
Copyright © Elsevier Masson SAS 2015

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

American Psychiatric Association. Practice guideline for the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder (revision). Am J Psychiatry 2000;157(4):145. [PubMed PMID: 10767867. Epub 2000/04/18. eng.].Google Scholar
Angst, J, Clayton, PPremorbid personality of depressive, bipolar, and schizophrenic patients with special reference to suicidal issues. Compr Psychiatry 1986;27(6):511532. [PubMed PMID: 3780193. Epub 1986/11/01. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Association AP Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 4th ed. Washington DC: Author; 2000.Google Scholar
Bagley, SL, Weaver, TL, Buchanan, TWSex differences in physiological and affective responses to stress in remitted depression. Physiol Behav 2011;104(2):180186. [PubMed PMID: 21396947].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Beevers, CG, Rohde, P, Stice, E, Nolen-Hoeksema, SRecovery from major depressive disorder among female adolescents: a prospective test of the scar hypothesis. J Consult Clin Psychol 2007;75(6):888900. [PubMed PMID: 18085906. Epub 2007/12/19. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Biondi, M, Picardi, APsychological stress and neuroendocrine function in humans: the last two decades of research. Psychother Psychosom 1999;68(3):114150. [PubMed PMID: 10224513].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Burcusa, SL, Iacono, WGRisk for recurrence in depression. Clin Psychol Rev 2007;27(8):959985. [PubMed PMID: 17448579. Pubmed Central PMCID: 2169519. Epub 2007/04/24. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Butler, AC, Hokanson, JE, Flynn, HAA comparison of self-esteem lability and low trait self-esteem as vulnerability factors for depression. J Pers Soc Psychol 1994;66(1):166177. [PubMed PMID: 8126646. Epub 1994/01/01. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bylsma, LM, Morris, BH, Rottenberg, JA meta-analysis of emotional reactivity in major depressive disorder. Clin Psychol Rev 2008;28(4):676691. [PubMed PMID: 18006196].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bylsma, LM, Taylor-Clift, A, Rottenberg, JEmotional reactivity to daily events in major and minor depression. J Abnorm Psychol 2011;120(1):155167. [PubMed PMID: 21319928. Epub 2011/02/16. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cikara, M, Girgus, JSUnpacking social hypersensitivity: vulnerability to the absence of positive feedback. Pers Soc Psychol Bull 2010;36(10):14091423. [PubMed PMID: 20841434. Epub 2010/09/16. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Clark, LA, Watson, D, Mineka, STemperament, personality, and the mood and anxiety disorders. J Abnorm Psychol 1994;103(1):103116. [PubMed PMID: 8040472. Epub 1994/02/01. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cohen, LH, Gunthert, KC, Butler, AC, O’Neill, SC, Tolpin, LHDaily affective reactivity as a prospective predictor of depressive symptoms. J Pers 2005;73(6):16871713. [PubMed PMID: 16274450].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Csikszentmihalyi, M, Larson, RValidity and reliability of the Experience-Sampling Method. J Nerv Ment Dis 1987;175(9):526536. [PubMed PMID: 3655778. Epub 1987/09/01. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cuijpers, P, van Straten, A, Schuurmans, J, van Oppen, P, Hollon, SD, Andersson, GPsychotherapy for chronic major depression and dysthymia: a meta-analysis. Clin Psychol Rev 2010;30(1):5162. [PubMed PMID: 19781837. Epub 2009/09/29. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Delespaul, PAssessing schizophrenia in daily life: the experience sampling method. Maastricht: University of Limburg; 1995.Google Scholar
Eaton, WW, Shao, H, Nestadt, G, Lee, HB, Bienvenu, OJ, Zandi, PPopulation-based study of first onset and chronicity in major depressive disorder. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2008;65(5):513520. [PubMed PMID: 18458203. Pubmed Central PMCID: 2761826. Epub 2008/05/07. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
First, MB, Spitzer, RL, Gibbon, M, Williams, JBWStructured clinical interview for DSM-IV axis I disorders.. New York: Biometrics Research Department, New York State Psychiatric Institute; 1995.Google Scholar
Gilbert, P, Allan, SThe role of defeat and entrapment (arrested flight) in depression: an exploration of an evolutionary view. Psychol Med 1998;28(3):585598. [PubMed PMID: 9626715. Epub 1998/06/17. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gotlib, IH, Hammen, CLPsychological aspects of depression: toward a cognitive-interpersonal integration. New York: Wiley; 1992.Google Scholar
Grillon, C, Franco-Chaves, JA, Mateus, CF, Ionescu, DF, Zarate, CAMajor depression is not associated with blunting of aversive responses; evidence for enhanced anxious anticipation. PLoS One 2013;8(8):e70969 [PubMed PMID: 23951057. Pubmed Central PMCID: 3738594. Epub 2013/08/21. eng.]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hamilton, MA rating scale for depression. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1960;23:5662. [PubMed PMID: 14399272. Pubmed Central PMCID: 495331. Epub 1960/02/01. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hammen, CStress generation in depression: reflections on origins, research, and future directions. J Clin Psychol 2006;62(9):10651082. [PubMed PMID: 16810666. Epub 2006/07/01. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hasler, G, Northoff, GDiscovering imaging endophenotypes for major depression. Mol Psychiatry 2011;16(6):604619. [PubMed PMID: 21602829. Epub 2011/05/24. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hirschfeld, RM, Klerman, GL, Lavori, P, Keller, MB, Griffith, P, Coryell, WPremorbid personality assessments of first onset of major depression. Arch Gen Psychiatry 1989;46(4):345350. [PubMed PMID: 2649038. Epub 1989/04/01. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
StataCorp. Stata Statistical Software: release 12.: College Station TX: StataCorp LP. 2011.Google Scholar
Kaufman, J, Yang, BZ, Douglas-Palumberi, H, Grasso, D, Lipschitz, D, Houshyar, Set al.Brain-derived neurotrophic factor-5-HTTLPR gene interactions and environmental modifiers of depression in children. Biol Psychiatry 2006;59(8):673680. [PubMed PMID: 16458264. Epub 2006/02/07. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kendell, RE, DiScipio, WJEysenck personality inventory scores of patients with depressive illnesses. Br J Psychiatry 1968;114(511):767770. [PubMed PMID: 5665961. Epub 1968/06/01. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Morris, MC, Rao, U, Garber, JCortisol responses to psychosocial stress predict depression trajectories: Social-evaluative threat and prior depressive episodes as moderators. J Affect Disord 2012;143(1–3):223230. [PubMed PMID: 22858210. Pubmed Central PMCID: 3489962. Epub 2012/08/04. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Morris, MC, Rao, U, Wang, L, Garber, JCortisol reactivity to experimentally manipulated psychosocial stress in young adults at varied risk for depression. Depress Anxiety 2013 [PubMed PMID: 23606237. Pubmed Central PMCID: 3735776. Epub 2013/04/23. Eng.].Google ScholarPubMed
Myin-Germeys, I, Peeters, F, Havermans, R, Nicolson, NA, DeVries, MW, Delespaul, Pet al.Emotional reactivity to daily life stress in psychosis and affective disorder: an experience sampling study. Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica 2003;107(2):124131. [PubMed PMID: 12534438].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Peeters, F, Nicolson, NA, Berkhof, JDelespaul P, deVries M. Effects of daily events on mood states in major depressive disorder. J Abnorm Psychol 2003;112(2):203211. [PubMed PMID: 12784829. Epub 2003/06/06. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Peeters, F, Berkhof, J, Rottenberg, J, Nicolson, NAAmbulatory emotional reactivity to negative daily life events predicts remission from major depressive disorder. Behav Res Ther 2010;48(8):754760. [PubMed PMID: 20537317. Epub 2010/06/12. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Roberts, JE, Kassel, JDLabile self-esteem, life stress, and depressive symptoms: Prospective data testing a model of vulnerability. Cognitive Ther Res 1997;21(5):569589. [PubMed PMID: ISI:A1997YH61700005. English].CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roberts, JE, Monroe, SMVulnerable self-esteem and depressive symptoms: prospective findings comparing three alternative conceptualizations. J Pers Soc Psychol 1992;62(5):804812. [PubMed PMID: 1593420. Epub 1992/05/01. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rottenberg, J, Gross, JJ, Gotlib, IHEmotion context insensitivity in major depressive disorder. J Abnorm Psychol 2005;114(4):627639. [PubMed PMID: 16351385e].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rottenberg, J, Joormann, J, Brozovich, F, Gotlib, IHEmotional intensity of idiographic sad memories in depression predicts symptom levels 1 year later. Emotion 2005;5(2):238242. [PubMed PMID: 15982090].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rush, AJ, Trivedi, MH, Wisniewski, SR, Nierenberg, AA, Stewart, JW, Warden, Det al.Acute and longer-term outcomes in depressed outpatients requiring one or several treatment steps: a STAR*D report. Am J Psychiatry 2006;163(11):19051917. [PubMed PMID: 17074942. Epub 2006/11/01. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Silk, JS, Davis, S, McMakin, DL, Dahl, RE, Forbes, EEWhy do anxious children become depressed teenagers? The role of social evaluative threat and reward processing. Psychological medicine 2012;42(10):20952107. [PubMed PMID: 22340187. Pubmed Central PMCID: 3360132].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Snijders, T, Bosker, RMultilevel analysis: an introduction to basic and advanced multilevel modeling. London: Sage; 1999.Google Scholar
Thompson, RJ, Mata, J, Jaeggi, SM, Buschkuehl, M, Jonides, J, Gotlib, IHThe everyday emotional experience of adults with major depressive disorder: examining emotional instability, inertia, and reactivity. J Abnorm Psychol 2012;121(4):819829. [PubMed PMID: 22708886. Pubmed Central PMCID: 3624976. Epub 2012/06/20. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
van Winkel, M, Peeters, F, van Winkel, R, Kenis, G, Collip, D, Geschwind, Net al.Impact of variation in the BDNF gene on social stress sensitivity and the buffering impact of positive emotions: replication and extension of a gene-environment interaction. Eur Neuropsychopharmacol 2014;24(6):930938. [PubMed PMID: 24613654].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wichers, M, Kenis, G, Jacobs, N, Myin-Germeys, I, Schruers, K, Mengelers, Ret al.The psychology of psychiatric genetics: evidence that positive emotions in females moderate genetic sensitivity to social stress associated with the BDNF Val-sup-6-sup-6Met polymorphism. J Abnorm Psychol 2008;117(3):699704. [PubMed PMID: 18729623].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wichers, MC, Barge-Schaapveld, DQ, Nicolson, NA, Peeters, F, de Vries, M, Mengelers, Ret al.Reduced stress-sensitivity or increased reward experience: the psychological mechanism of response to antidepressant medication. Neuropsychopharmacology 2009;34(4):923931. [PubMed PMID: 18496519].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wichers, M, Geschwind, N, van Os, J, Peeters, FScars in depression: is a conceptual shift necessary to solve the puzzle?. Psychol Med 2010;40(3):359365. [PubMed PMID: 20120516. Epub 2010/02/03. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zimmerman, M, Chelminski, I, Posternak, MA review of studies of the Hamilton depression rating scale in healthy controls: implications for the definition of remission in treatment studies of depression. J Nerv Ment Dis 2004;192(9):595601. [PubMed PMID: 15348975. Epub 2004/09/07. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zimmerman, M, Martinez, J, Attiullah, N, Friedman, M, Toba, C, Boerescu, DAet al.Further evidence that the cutoff to define remission on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale should be lowered. Depress Anxiety 2012;29(2):159165. [PubMed PMID: 22495942. Epub 2012/04/13. eng.].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.
39
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Daily life stress reactivity in remitted versus non-remitted depressed individuals
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Daily life stress reactivity in remitted versus non-remitted depressed individuals
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Daily life stress reactivity in remitted versus non-remitted depressed individuals
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *