Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-dc8c957cd-wvcbk Total loading time: 0.307 Render date: 2022-01-27T04:44:49.215Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

DSM-IV mental disorders and neurological complications in children and adolescents with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection (HIV-1)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

D. Misdrahi
Affiliation:
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Department, Necker Enfants Malades Hospital, 149, rue de Sèvres, 75015Paris, France
G. Vila*
Affiliation:
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Department, Necker Enfants Malades Hospital, 149, rue de Sèvres, 75015Paris, France
I. Funk-Brentano
Affiliation:
Immunology and Hematology Pediatric Department, Necker Enfants Malades Hospital, 149, rue de Sèvres, 75015Paris, France
M. Tardieu
Affiliation:
Pediatric Neurology Department, CHU de Bicêtre, le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France
S. Blanche
Affiliation:
Immunology and Hematology Pediatric Department, Necker Enfants Malades Hospital, 149, rue de Sèvres, 75015Paris, France
M.C. Mouren-Simeoni
Affiliation:
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Department, Necker Enfants Malades Hospital, 149, rue de Sèvres, 75015Paris, France
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail address: cmp.tiphaine@wanadoo.fr (G. Vila).
Get access

Abstract

Aim

To study the types of psychiatric problem encountered in children infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and their relationship to central nervous system disorder and the severity of infection.

Methods

17 HIV-infected children presenting with psychiatric problems were included. Mental disorders were evaluated according to DSM-IV criteria. Neurological disorders and progressive encephalopathy (presence or absence) diagnosis were evaluated by clinical and radiological examination. The severity of infection was assessed by the percentage of CD4 lymphocytes.

Results

The most frequent diagnoses were major depression (MDD: 47%) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD: 29%). Major depression diagnosis was significantly associated with neuroimaging or clinical neurological abnormalities (p < 0.01). In contrast, no association was found between hyperactivity diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria and central nervous system disorder. Percentage of CD4 lymphocytes were close to 0 for more than 80% of children presenting with psychiatric complications.

Conclusion

The very low % of CD4 lymphocytes of these children suggest that the appearance of a psychiatric complication should be regarded as a factor indicating severe HIV infection. Depressive disorders may be a clinical form of encephalopathy.

Type
Case report
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 European Psychiatric Association

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders DSM IV. 4th ed. Washington DC: APA; 1995.Google Scholar
Brouwers, PDeCarli, CCivitello, LMoss, HWolters, PPizzo, P.Correlation between computed tomographic brain scan abnormalities and neuropsychological function in children with symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus disease. Arch Neurol 1995;52:39–44.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bussing, RBurket, RCAnxiety and intrafamilial stress in children with hemophilia after the HIV crisis. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 1993;32:562–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Classification system for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in children under 13 years of age. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 1987; 36: 225–36.Google Scholar
Havens, JFWhitaker, AHFeldman, JFEhrhardt, AA.Psychiatric morbidity in school age children with congenital human immunideficiency virus infection: a pilot study. J Dev Behav Pediatr 1994;15:18–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moss, HBose, SWolters, PBrouwers, P.A preliminary study of factors associated with psychological adjustment and disease course in school-age children infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. J Dev Behav Pediatr 1998;19:18–25.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Moss, HABrouwers, PWolters, PLWiener, LHersh, SPizzo, PA.The development of a Q-sort behavioral rating procedure for pediatric HIV patients. J Pediatr Psychol 1994;19:27–46.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vreugdenhil, HBrouwers, PWolters, PBakker, DMoss, H.Spontaneous eye blinking, a measure of dopaminergic function, in children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 1997;151:1025–32.Google ScholarPubMed
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.
38
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

DSM-IV mental disorders and neurological complications in children and adolescents with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection (HIV-1)
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

DSM-IV mental disorders and neurological complications in children and adolescents with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection (HIV-1)
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

DSM-IV mental disorders and neurological complications in children and adolescents with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection (HIV-1)
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *