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Whose Atlantic? – Historiographies of South Africa, Namibia, OPSAAAL, and Central America

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 April 2019

Abstract:

During the 1970s and 1980s, southern African liberation movements lent rhetorical and sometimes material support to Central American guerilla groups. Such action represented both change and continuity within the previous decade’s non-aligned solidarities. This paper explores these connections and attempts to explain their significance on both sides of the ocean. It draws upon research in southern African and American archives in order to re-examine both spaces’ historiographies. Finally, it asks what these solidarities tell us about the nature of Cold War trans-oceanic linkages, fits them into debates over the nature of the discursive Atlantic, and ponders whether previous scholarship has effectively explored their significance.

Résumé:

Dans les années 1970 et 1980, les mouvements de libération de l’Afrique australe ont apporté un soutien rhétorique et parfois matériel aux groupes de guérilla centraméricains. Cette action représentait à la fois un changement et une continuité dans les solidarités non alignées de la décennie précédente. Cet article explore ces liens et tente d’expliquer leur signification des deux côtés de l’océan Atlantique. Il s’appuie sur des recherches dans les archives sud-africaines et américaines afin de réexaminer les historiographies de ces deux aires géographiques. Enfin, il interroge ce que ces solidarités nous disent sur la nature des liens transocéaniques de la guerre froide. En intégrant ces solidarités dans les débats sur la nature de l’Atlantique discursif, cet article se demande si les études précédentes ont effectivement exploré leur signification.

Type
Critical Historiography
Copyright
Copyright © African Studies Association 2018 

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