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Mapping a Research Agenda Concerning Gender and Climate Change: A Review of the Literature

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2020

Abstract

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Type
Literature Review
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Hypatia, Inc.

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References

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