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J'accuse! depression as a likely culprit in cases of AD

  • David C. Steffens (a1)
Abstract

Clinicians have long appreciated the links between depression, cognitive impairment, and development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. More recently, investigators in the fields of epidemiology, genetics, neuroimaging, and neuropathology have sought to quantify the risk and to understand the underlying neurobiology of the relationship between depression and AD.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Email: steffens@uchc.edu
References
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Barnes D. E. and Yaffe K. (2011). The projected effect of risk factor reduction on Alzheimer's disease prevalence. Lancet Neurology, 10, 819828.
Burke S. L., Maramaldi P., Cadet T. and Kukull W. (2016). Associations between depression, sleep disturbance, and apolipoprotein E in the development of Alzheimer's disease. International Psychogeriatrics. doi:10.1017/S1041610216000405.
Modrego P. J. and Ferrández J. (2004). Depression in patients with mild cognitive impairment increases the risk of developing dementia of Alzheimer type: a prospective cohort study. Archives of Neurology, 61, 12901293.
Jorm A. F. (2001). History of depression as a risk factor for dementia: an updated review. Australia and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 35, 776781.
Sheline Y. I., Sanghavi M., Mintun M. A. and Gado M. H. (1999). Depression duration but not age predicts hippocampal volume loss in medically healthy women with recurrent major depression. Journal of Neuroscience, 19, 50345043.
Steffens D. C., Plassman B. L., Helms M. J., Welsh-Bohmer K. A., Saunders A. M. and Breitner J. C. (1997). A twin study of late-onset depression and apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 as risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Biological Psychiatry, 41, 851856.
Steffens D. C., McQuoid D. R., Payne M. E. and Potter G. G. (2011). Change in hippocampal volume on magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive decline among older depressed and nondepressed subjects in the neurocognitive outcomes of depression in the elderly study. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 19, 412.
Steffens D. C., McQuoid D. R. and Potter G. G. (2014). Amnestic mild cognitive impairment and incident dementia and Alzheimer's disease in geriatric depression. International Psychogeriatrics, 26, 20292036.
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International Psychogeriatrics
  • ISSN: 1041-6102
  • EISSN: 1741-203X
  • URL: /core/journals/international-psychogeriatrics
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