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Longitudinal relationships among depressive symptoms and three types of memory self-report in cognitively intact older adults

  • Nikki L. Hill (a1), Jacqueline Mogle (a2), Sakshi Bhargava (a1), Tyler Reed Bell (a1), Iris Bhang (a1), Mindy Katz (a3) and Martin J. Sliwinski (a2)...

Abstract

Objectives:

The current study examined whether self-reported memory problems among cognitively intact older adults changed concurrently with, preceded, or followed depressive symptoms over time.

Design:

Data were collected annually via in-person comprehensive medical and neuropsychological examinations as part of the Einstein Aging Study.

Setting:

Community-dwelling older adults in an urban, multi-ethnic area of New York City were interviewed.

Participants:

The current study included a total of 1,162 older adults (Mage = 77.65, SD = 5.03, 63.39% female; 74.12% White). Data were utilized from up to 11 annual waves per participant.

Measurements:

Multilevel modeling tested concurrent and lagged associations between three types of memory self-report (frequency of memory problems, perceived one-year decline, and perceived ten-year decline) and depressive symptoms.

Results:

Results showed that self-reported frequency of memory problems covaried with depressive symptoms only in participants who were older at baseline. Changes in perceived one-year and ten-year memory decline were related to changes in depressive symptoms across all ages. Depressive symptoms increased the likelihood of perceived ten-year memory decline the next year; however, perceived ten-year memory decline did not predict future depressive symptoms. Additionally, no significant temporal relationship was observed between depressive symptoms and self-reported frequency of memory problems or perceived one-year memory decline.

Conclusion:

Our findings highlight the importance of testing the unique associations of different types of self-reported memory problems with depressive symptoms.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Correspondence should be addressed to: Nikki L. Hill, College of Nursing, Pennsylvania State University, 201 Nursing Sciences Building, University Park, PA, 16802 USA. Phone: 814-867-3265; Fax: 814-863-1027. Email: nikki.hill@psu.edu.

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Keywords

Longitudinal relationships among depressive symptoms and three types of memory self-report in cognitively intact older adults

  • Nikki L. Hill (a1), Jacqueline Mogle (a2), Sakshi Bhargava (a1), Tyler Reed Bell (a1), Iris Bhang (a1), Mindy Katz (a3) and Martin J. Sliwinski (a2)...

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