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The quasi-static growth of CO2 bubbles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 March 2014

Oscar R. Enríquez*
Affiliation:
Physics of Fluids Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands
Chao Sun
Affiliation:
Physics of Fluids Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands
Detlef Lohse
Affiliation:
Physics of Fluids Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands
Andrea Prosperetti
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
Devaraj van der Meer
Affiliation:
Physics of Fluids Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands
*
Email address for correspondence: oscarenriquez@gmail.com

Abstract

We study experimentally the growth of an isolated gas bubble in a slightly supersaturated water–CO2 solution at 6 atm pressure. In contrast to what was found in previous experiments at higher supersaturation, the time evolution of the bubble radius differs noticeably from existing theoretical solutions. We trace the differences back to several combined effects of the concentration boundary layer around the bubble, which we disentangle in this work. In the early phase, the interaction with the surface on which the bubble grows slows down the process. In contrast, in the final phase, before bubble detachment, the growth rate is enhanced by the onset of density-driven convection. We also show that the bubble growth is affected by prior growth and detachment events, though they are up to 15 min apart.

Type
Rapids
Copyright
© 2014 Cambridge University Press 

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