Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Biomimetics and cilia propulsion

  • MARTIN R. MAXEY (a1)
Abstract

Many swimming microorganisms are able to propel themselves by the organized beating motion of numerous short flagella or cilia attached to their body surface. For their small size and the inherently viscous nature of the motion, this mechanism is very effective and they can swim several body lengths per second. The quest has been to see if artificial cilia may be developed and if the strategy of cilia propulsion can be used in microfluidic devices to transport fluids in a localized and controllable manner. Babataheri et al. (J. Fluid Mech., this issue, vol. 678, 2011, pp. 5–13) explore the response of chains of small paramagnetic beads that are elastically bonded together to form artificial cilia. The chain or fleximag is tethered to the surface and driven by external magnetic fields, responding also to both fluid and elastic forces. A key observation from their experiments and model is that for a simple planar-forcing strategy there is a hidden symmetry that limits the net transport of fluid.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Biomimetics and cilia propulsion
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Biomimetics and cilia propulsion
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Biomimetics and cilia propulsion
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Journal of Fluid Mechanics
  • ISSN: 0022-1120
  • EISSN: 1469-7645
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-fluid-mechanics
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×
MathJax

Keywords:

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

This erratum applies to the following article(s)