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    Huang, Zhao-Qin Winterfeld, Philip H. Xiong, Yi Wu, Yu-Shu and Yao, Jun 2015. Parallel simulation of fully-coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical processes in CO2 leakage through fluid-driven fracture zones. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, Vol. 34, p. 39.


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  • Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Volume 740
  • February 2014, pp. 1-4

The fluid mechanics of dissolution trapping in geologic storage of CO2

  • D. Bolster (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/jfm.2013.531
  • Published online: 01 January 2014
Abstract
Abstract

Sequestration of carbon dioxide by injecting it into the deep subsurface is critical to successful mitigation of climate change by reducing anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. To achieve this we must understand how CO2 moves in the subsurface. Many interesting fluid mechanics problems emerge. Szulczewski, Hesse & Juanes (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 736, 2013, pp. 287–315) focus on one critical aspect, namely the dissolution of CO2 into the fluid resident in the subsurface and the flow dynamics that ensue. Even for this single problem, an elegant analysis identifies seven behavioural regimes that control the amount and timing of dissolution.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Email address for correspondence: diogobolster@gmail.com
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

M. Dentz & D. M. Tartakovsky 2009 Abrupt-interface solution for carbon dioxide injection into porous media. Trans. Porous Med. 79 (1), 1527.

S. M. V. Gilfillan , B. S. Lollar , G. Holland , D. Blagburn , S. Stevens , M. Schoell , M. Cassidy , Z. Ding , Z. Zhou , G. Lacrampe-Couloume & C. J. Ballentine 2009 Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant ${\mathrm{CO} }_{2} $ sink in natural gas fields. Nature 458, 614618.

M. J. Golding , H. E. Huppert & J. A. Neufeld 2013 The effects of capillary forces on the axisymmetric propagation of two-phase, constant-flux gravity currents in porous media. Phys. Fluids 25, 036602.

J. J. Hidalgo , J. Fe , L. Cueto-Felgueroso & R. Juanes 2012 Scaling of convective mixing in porous media. Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 (26), 264503.

T. J. Kneafsey & K. Pruess 2010 Laboratory flow experiments for visualizing carbon dioxide-induced, density-driven brine convection. Trans. Porous Med. 82, 123139.

C. W. MacMinn & R. Juanes 2013 Buoyant currents arrested by convective dissolution. Geophys. Res. Lett. 40, 20172022.

V. Vilarrasa , D. Bolster , S. Olivella & J. Carrera 2010 Coupled hydromechanical modelling of ${\mathrm{CO} }_{2} $ sequestration in deep saline aquifers. Intl J. Greenh. Gas Control 4 (6), 910919.

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Journal of Fluid Mechanics
  • ISSN: 0022-1120
  • EISSN: 1469-7645
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-fluid-mechanics
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