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The morphology of organic nanocolumn arrays: Amorphous versus crystalline solids

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Jian Zhang*
Affiliation:
Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin, Germany
Ingo Salzmann
Affiliation:
Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin, Germany
Peter Schäfer
Affiliation:
Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin, Germany
Martin Oehzelt
Affiliation:
Institut für Experimentalphysik, Johannes Kepler Universität Linz, A-4040 Linz, Austria
Steffen Duhm
Affiliation:
Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin, Germany
Jürgen P. Rabe
Affiliation:
Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin, Germany
Norbert Koch*
Affiliation:
Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin, Germany
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Abstract

The morphology of nanocolumns grown by glancing angle deposition is studied for molecular materials forming amorphous and crystalline solids. Amorphous tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum nanocolumn arrays were obtained at sample rotation speeds varying from 0.3 rpm (revolutions per minute) to 30 rpm. For crystalline pentacene, an array of regular nanocolumns formed at a rotation speed of 3 rpm, while higher and lower rotation speeds led to a wide distribution of column heights and shapes. The incoming molecular flux and the molecular diffusion length on column surfaces, both dependent on rotation speed, were found to govern the resulting morphology of crystalline pentacene nanocolumns.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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