Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-dnb4q Total loading time: 0.242 Render date: 2022-07-04T13:09:04.042Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Lower Permian Brachiopods from Wasp Head Formation, Sydney Basin, Southeastern Australia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 October 2015

Gabriela A. Cisterna
Affiliation:
Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas-Museo de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de La Rioja, Avda. Dr. Luis M. de La Fuente s/n, La Rioja 5300, Argentina,
G. R. Shi
Affiliation:
School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Melbourne Campus at Burwood, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia,

Abstract

Although there is a generally accepted framework for the Permian marine biogeography of Australia, significant uncertainties remain concerning the temporal biogeographical changes closely related to the timing of Permian glacial–interglacial events. Several recent studies along these research lines demonstrate the importance of a reliable high-resolution biostratigraphical timescale for paleobiogeographical and paleoclimatic reconstructions. This paper provides, for the first time, a full taxonomic and biostratigraphical study of the brachiopod fauna from the Wasp Head Formation, southern Sydney Basin, southeastern Australia. The fauna is associated with deposits of the first Permian glacial interval suggested for eastern Australia. Three brachiopod assemblages are recognized. The lower and middle assemblages contain scarce brachiopods although associated bivalves are comparatively more common. Despite very low diversity and low abundance, these two brachiopod assemblages contain characteristic species of the Strophalosia concentrica and Strophalosia subcircularis brachiopod zones, both considered of late Asselian age. The third assemblage, occurring in the uppermost part of the formation, contains more brachiopods than bivalves and is referred to early Sakmarian in age. The species diversity and stratigraphic occurrences of the brachiopod assemblages in relation to sedimentary facies suggest that the lower two assemblages may represent an intra-glacial interval while the younger third assemblage, characterized by abundant occurrences of Trigonotreta and Tomiopsis species, accompanied by the bivalve Eurydesma, is more indicative of a post-glacial benthic marine fauna comparable to coeval brachiopod faunas found elsewhere in Gondwana.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Paleontological Society 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Apak, S. N. and Backhouse, J. 1999. Stratigraphy and petroleum exploration objectives of Permo–Carboniferous succession on the Barbwire Terrace and adjacent areas, northwest Canning Basin Western Australia. Geological Survey of Western Australia, 29:267276.Google Scholar
Archbold, N. W. 1983. Permian marine invertebrate provinces of Gondwana Realm. Alcheringa, 7:5973.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Archbold, N. W. 1991. Trigonotreta (Spiriferida, Brachiopoda) from the Early Permian of Victoria. Alcheringa, 15:321326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Archbold, N. W. 1996. Paleobiogeography of Australian Permian brachiopod faunas, p. 1923. In Copper, P. and Jisuo, J. (eds.), Proceeding of the Third International Brachiopod Congress. A. A. Balkema, Rotterdam.Google Scholar
Archbold, N. W. 2000. Palaeobiogeograpohy of the Australasian Permian. Memoir of Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, 23:287310.Google Scholar
Archbold, N. W. 2001. Pan-Gondwanan, Early Permian (Asselian–Sakmarian–Aktastinian) correlations, p. 2939. In Weiss, R. H. (ed.), Contributions to Geology and Palaeontology of Gondwana in honour of Helmut Wopfner. Geological Institute, University Cologne, Cologne.Google Scholar
Archbold, N. W. 2003. Marine Early Permian (Asselian–Sakmarian) invertebrates Palaeontology of DM Tangorin DDH1Cranky Corner Basin, New South Wales. New South Wales department of Mineral Resources, Coal and Petroleum Bulletin, 4:155166.Google Scholar
Archbold, N. W. and Thomas, G. A. 1986. Permian Ingelarellidae (brachiopoda) from Western Australia and Argentina. Journal of Paleontology, 60:581605.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Armstrong, E. C. 1969. The Martiniacean species occurring at Glendon, New South Wales, the type locality of Notospirifer darwini (Morris). Journal Proceeding of Royal Society of New South Wales, 101:197204.Google Scholar
Armstrong, E. C. 1970. Micro-ornaments of the spiriferid brachiopods Notospirifer, Ingelarella and Subansiria . Lethaia, 3:287300.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Balinski, A. 1975. Secondary changes in microornamentation of some Devonian ambocoelid brachiopods. Palaeontology, 18:179189.Google Scholar
Benediktova, R. N. 1956. Spiriferidy Ostrogskoi svity Kuzbassa. Voprosy Geologii Kuzbassa, Materialy vtorogo soveshcheniya po stratigrafii uglenosnykh otlozhenii, 1:169182. (In Russian) Google Scholar
Briggs, D. J. C. 1998. Permian Productidina and Strophalosiidina from the Sydney-Bowen Basin and New England Orogen: Systematics and biostratigraphic significance. Memoir of the Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, 19:1258.Google Scholar
Brunton, H. C. 1976. Micro-ornamentation of some spiriferide brachiopods. Palaeontology, 19:767771.Google Scholar
Brunton, H. C., Lazarev, S. S., and Grant, R. E. 2000. Productida, p. 350643. In Williams, A. et al. (eds.), Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, Pt. H, Brachiopoda (revised) 2–3. Geological Society of America and University of Kansas Press, Lawrence.Google Scholar
Campbell, K. S. W. 1959. The Martiniopsis-like spiriferids of the Queensland Permian. Palaeontology, 1:333350.Google Scholar
Campbell, K. S. W. 1961. New species of the Permian spiriferoids Ingelarella and Notospirifer from Queensland and their stratigraphic implications. Palaeontographica, Abteilung A, 117:159192.Google Scholar
Campbell, K. S. W. 1965. Australian Permian Terebratuloids. Bulletin of the Department of National Development Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics, 68:1146.Google Scholar
Carter, J. L. and Gourvennec, R. 2006. Martinioidea, p. 17471768. In Kaesler, R. L. (ed.), Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, Pt. H, Brachiopoda (revised) 5. Geological Society of America and University of Kansas Press, Lawrence.Google Scholar
Carter, J. L., Johnson, J. G., Gourvennec, R., and Hou, H.-F. 2006 . Spiriferida, p. 16891870. In Williams, A. et al. (eds.), Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology. Pt. H, Brachiopoda (revised) 5. Geological Society of America and University of Kansas, Lawrence.Google Scholar
Cisterna, G. A. and Archbold, N. W. 2007. Spiriferoidea (brachiopoda) from the early Permian del Salto Formation of Argentina. Alcheringa, 31:316.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cisterna, G. A. and Sterren, A. F. 2008. Late Carboniferous Levipustula fauna in the Leoncito Formation, San Juan province, Argentine Precordillera: Biostratigraphical and palaeoclimatological implications. Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria, 120:137147.Google Scholar
Cisterna, G. A. and Sterren, A. F. 2010. Levipustula Fauna” in central-western Argentina and its relationships with the Carboniferous glacial event in the southwestern Gondwanan margin. Geological Society of America Special Paper, 468:133147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clapham, M. E. and James, N. P. 2008. Paleoecology of early-middle Permian marine communities in eastern Australia: Response to global climate change in the aftermath of the late Paleozoic ice age. Palaios, 23:738750.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clapham, M. E. and James, N. P. 2012. Regional-scale marine faunal change in eastern Australia during Permian climate fluctuations and its relationship to local community restructuring. Palaios, 27:627635.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clarke, M. J. 1969. Tasmanian Strophalosiidae. Record of Geological Survey of Tasmania, 10:151.Google Scholar
Clarke, M. J. 1979 . The Tasmanian Permian spiriferid brachiopods Trigonotreta rachi Koenig, 1825, Grantonia hobartensis Brown, 1953 and Spirifer tasmaniensis Morris, 1845. Journal of Paleontology, 53:197207.Google Scholar
Clarke, M. J. 1990. Late Palaeozoic (Tamarian: Late Carboniferous–Early Permian) cold-water brachiopods from Tasmania. Alcheringa, 14:5376.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clarke, M. J. 1992. Hellyerian and Tamarian (Late Carboniferous–Lower Permian) invertebrate faunas from Tasmania. Geological Survey of Tasmania Bulletin, 69:152.Google Scholar
Clarke, M. J. and Farmer, N. 1976. Biostratigraphic nomenclature for late Palaeozoic rocks in Tasmania. Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania, 110:91109.Google Scholar
Dickins, J. M., Gostin, V. A., and Runnegar, B. N. 1969. The age of the Permian sequence in the southern part of the Sydney Basin, p. 211255. In Campbell, K. S. W. (ed.), Stratigraphy and Palaeontology, Essays in Honour of Dorothy Hill. Australian National University Press, Canberra.Google Scholar
Di Pascuo, M., Martínez, M., and Freije, H. 2008. The first palynological record of the Sauce Grande Formation (Pennsylvanian–Cisuralian) at the Australes range, Buenos Aires province, Argentine. Ameghiniana, 45:6981.Google Scholar
Duméril, A. M. C. 1806. Zoologie analytique ou rachi naturelle de classification de animaux. Allais, Paris, 344 p.Google Scholar
Etheridge, R. 1892. The organic remains of the Permo–Carboniferous System. Class Brachiopoda, p. 225264. In Jack, R. L. and Etheridge, R. (eds.), The Geology and Palaeontology of Queensland and New Guinea. Government Printer, Brisbane and Dulau and Company, London.Google Scholar
Fielding, C. R, Frank, T. D., Birgenheier, L. P., Rygel, M. C., Jones, A. T., and Roberts, J. 2008 a. Stratigraphic imprint of the late Palaeozoic Ice Age in eastern Australia: A record of alternating glacial and nonglacial climate regime. Journal of the Geological Society, 165:129140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fielding, C. R., Frank, T. D., Birgenheier, L. P., Rygel, M. C., Jones, A. T., and Roberts, J. 2008 b. Stratigraphic record and facies associations of the late Paleozoic age in Eastern Australia (New South Wales and Queesland). Geological Society of America Special Paper, 441:4157.Google Scholar
Foster, C. B. and Archbold, N. W. 2001. Chronologic anchor points for the Permian and early Triassic of the eastern Australian basins, p. 175197. In Weiss, R. H. (ed.), Contributions to Geology and Palaeontology of Gondwana, in Honour of Helmut Wopfner. Geological Institute, University of Cologne.Google Scholar
Gostin, V. A. and Herbert, C. 1973. Stratigraphy of the Upper Carboniferous and Lower Permian sequence, southern Sydney Basin. Journal of the Geological Society of Australia, 20:4970.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gourvennec, R. and Carter, J. L. 2007. Spiriferida and Spiriferinida, p. 27722796. In Selden, P. A. (ed.), Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, Part H, Brachiopoda (revised) 6 supplement. Geological Society of America and University of Kansas, Lawrence.Google Scholar
Harrington, H. J. 1955. The Permian Eurydesma fauna of eastern Argentina. Journal of Paleontology, 29:112128.Google Scholar
King, W. 1844. On a new genus of Palaeozoic shells. Annals and Magazine of Natural History, 14:313317.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
King, W. 1846. Remarks on certain genera belonging to the class Palliobranchiata. Annals and Magazine of Natural History, London 18:2642, 83–94.Google Scholar
Koenig, C. 1825. Icones Fossilium Sectiles. British Museum, London, 4 p.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Konincki, L. G. 1877. Recherches sur les rachio Palaeozoiques de la Nouvelle-Galles du Sud (Australie). Mémoires de la Société des Sciences de Liège, 2 (7):1235.Google Scholar
López Gamundí, O. R., Conaghan, P. J., and Rossello, E. A. 1995. The Tunas Formation (Permian) in the Sierras Australes fold belt, east central Argentina: Evidence for syntectonic sedimentation in a foreland basin. Journal of South American Earth Sciences, 8 (2):129142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McClung, G. 1978. Morphology, palaeoecology and biostratigraphy of lngelarella (Brachiopoda: Spiriferida) in the Bowen and Sydney Basins of Eastern Australia. Geological Survey of Queensland, Publication 365, Palaeontological Paper, 40:1760.Google Scholar
McClung, G. and Armstrong, J. D. 1975. New species of Martiniopsis (Brachiopoda: Spiriferida) from the Permian of eastern Australia. Queensland Government Mining Journal, 76:231234.Google Scholar
McClung, G. and Armstrong, J. D. 1978. Species of Glendonia gen. nov. (Ingelarellinae: Spiriferida) in the Permian of eastern Australia. Geological Survey of Queensland Publication 365, Palaeontological Paper, 39:19.Google Scholar
Mory, A. J. and Backhouse, J. 1997. Permian stratigraphy and palynology of the Carnarvon Basin, Western Australia. Geological Survey of Western Australia Report, 51:141.Google Scholar
Nillsen, S. A. A. 1982. A paleontological study of the Permian Wasp Head Formation and the lowermost Pebbly Beach Formations of the southern Sydney Basin, New South Wales. Unpublished M.Sc. Thesis, Department of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Queensland, 188 p.Google Scholar
Pagani, M. A. 1998. Braquiópodos y gastrópodos pérmicos de las Formaciones Piedra Azul Bonete (Provincia de Buenos. Aires). Ameghiniana, 35:265270.Google Scholar
Pagani, M. A. 2000. Bivalvos del Pérmico Inferior de la Formación Bonete, Sierras Australes (provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina). Ameghiniana, 37:301329.Google Scholar
Runnegar, B. N. 1969. Permian fossils from the southern extremity of the Sydney Basin, p. 276298. In Campbell, K. S. W. (ed.), Stratigraphy and Palaeontology. Australian National University Press, Canberra.Google Scholar
Runnegar, B. N. 1980. Biostratigraphy of the Shoalhaven Group. Bulletin of Geological Survey NSW, 26:376382.Google Scholar
Runnegar, B. N. and McClung, G. 1975. A Permian time scale for Gondwanaland, p. 425441. In Campbell, K. S. W. (ed.), Gondwana Geology Papers presented at the Third Gondwana Symposium. Australia National University, Canberra.Google Scholar
Rygel, M. C., Fielding, C. R., Bann, K. R., Frank, T. D., Birgenheier, L. P., and Tye, S. C. 2008. The Lower Permian Wasp Head Formation, Sydney Basin: High-latitude, shallow marine sedimentation following the late Asselian to early Sakmarian glacial event in eastern Australia. Sedimentology, 55:15171540.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sahni, M. R. and Srivastava, J. P. 1956. Discovery of Eurydesma and Conularia in the eastern Himalaya and description of associated faunas. Journal of the Palaeontological Society of India, 1:202214.Google Scholar
Sarytcheva, T. G. and Sokolskaya, A. N. 1959. O klassifikatsin lozhnoporistykh brachiopod. Akademiia Nauk SSSR, Doklady (Moscow), 125:181184. (In Russian) Google Scholar
Schuchert, C. 1913. Class Brachiopoda. The Lower Devonian deposits of Maryland. Maryland Geological Survey, Baltimore, p. 2902449.Google Scholar
Schuchert, C. 1893. A classification of the Brachiopoda. American Geologist, 11 (3):141167.Google Scholar
Shen, S. Z., Shi, G. R., and Zhu, K. Y. 2000. Early Permian brachiopods of Gondwana affinity from the Dingjiazhai Formation, Baoshan Block, western Yunnan, China. Rivista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia, 106:263282.Google Scholar
Shen, S. Z., Zhang, H., Shi, G. R., Li, W. Z., Xie, J. F., Mu, L., and Fan, J. X. 2013. Early Permian (Cisuralian) global brachiopod palaeobiogeography. Gondwana Research, 24:104124.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shi, G. R. and Archbold, N. W. 1993. Distribution of Asselian to Tastubian (early Permian) Circum Pacific brachiopod faunas. Memoir of Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, 15:343351.Google Scholar
Shi, G. R., Waterhouse, J. B., and McLoughlin, S. 2010. The Lopingian of Australasia: A review of biostratigraphy, correlations, palaeogeography, and palaeobiogeography. Geological Journal, 45:230263.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stehli, F. G. 1954. Lower Leonardian Brachiopoda of the Sierra del Diablo. Bulletin of American Museum of National History, 105:257358.Google Scholar
Tye, S. C., Fielding, C. R., and Jones, B. G. 1996. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of the Permian Talaterang and Shoalhaven Groups in the southernmost Sydney Basin, New South Wales. Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, 43:5769.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Waagen, W. 1883. Salt Range Fossils. I. Productus-Limenstone Fossils. Memoirs of the Geological Survey of India, Palaeontologia Indica, Series 13, 4:391546.Google Scholar
Waagen, W. 1884. Salt Range Fossils. I. Productus-Limenstone Fossils. Memoirs of the Geological Survey of India, Palaeontologia Indica, Series 13, 4:547610.Google Scholar
Waterhouse, J. B. 1971. The brachiopod genus Tomiopsis Benedictova from the Permian of Canada. Journal of Paleontology, 45:6880.Google Scholar
Waterhouse, J. B. 1986. A new Permian brachiopod genus related to Ambikella Sahni and Srivastava. Bulletin Indian Geological Association, 19 (2):109112.Google Scholar
Waterhouse, J. B. 1987. Late Palaeozoic Mollusca and correlations from the Southeast Bowen Basin, east Australia. Palaeontolographica, Abteiulung A, 198:1233.Google Scholar
Waterhouse, J. B. 1998. Ingelarelloidea (Spiriferida: Brachiopoda) from Australia and New Zealand, and reclassification of Ingelarellidae and Notospirifidae. Earthwise, 1:148.Google Scholar
Waterhouse, J. B. 2008. Golden Spikes and black flags: Macro-invertebrate faunal zones for the Permian of east Australia. Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria, 120 (1):345372.Google Scholar
Waterhouse, J. B. 2011. Origen and evolution of Permian brachiopods of Australia. Memoirs of the Association of Australasian Palaeontologist, 41:205228.Google Scholar
Waterhouse, J. B. and Shi, G. R. 2010. Evolution in a cold climate. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 298:1730.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Waterhouse, J. B. and Shi, G. R. 2013. Climatic implications from the sequential changes in diversity and biogeographic affinities for brachiopods and bivalves in the Permian of eastern Australia and New Zealand. Gondwana Research, 24:139147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Waterhouse, J. B., Briggs, D. J. C., and Parfrey, S. M. 1983. The major faunal assemblages in the Early Permian Tiverton Formation near Homevale Homestead, Northern Bowen basin, Queensland, p. 121138. In Foster, C. B. (ed.), Permian Geology of Queensland, Brisbane. Geological Society of Australia, Queensland Division.Google Scholar
Weldon, E. A. and Shi, G. R. 2001. The Late Palaeozoic Brachiopod Genus Tomiopsis Benediktova, 1956 from Eastern Australia: Palaeobiogeographic implications. Gondwana Research, 4:822823.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Whitfield, R. P. 1908. Notes and observations on Carboniferous fossils and semifossil shells brought home by members of the Peary expedition of 1905–1906. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 24 (2):5158.Google Scholar
Williams, A. 1953. The classification of the strophomenoid brachiopods. Washington Academy of Sciences Journal, 43:113.Google Scholar
Williams, A., Carlson, S. J., Brunton, C. H. C., Homer, L. E., and Popov, L. E. 1996. A supra-ordinal classification of the Brachiopoda. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series B, 351:11711193.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Williams, A., Brunton, C. H. C., and Wright, A. D. 2000. Orthotetida, p. 644689. In Williams, A. et al. (eds.), Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology. Pt. H. Brachiopoda (revised) 3. Geological Society of America and University of Kansas, Lawrence.Google Scholar
8
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Lower Permian Brachiopods from Wasp Head Formation, Sydney Basin, Southeastern Australia
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Lower Permian Brachiopods from Wasp Head Formation, Sydney Basin, Southeastern Australia
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Lower Permian Brachiopods from Wasp Head Formation, Sydney Basin, Southeastern Australia
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *