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A new soft-bodied fauna: The Pioche Formation of Nevada

  • Bruce S. Lieberman (a1)

Abstract

A new Burgess Shale-type soft-bodied fauna crossing the Lower-Middle Cambrian boundary in the Comet Shale Member of the Pioche Formation in Lincoln County, Nevada, contains common remains of soft-bodied ecdysozoan taxa. These fossils provide important new information about the nature and variety of Cambrian soft-bodied organisms. Arthropod taxa include one species of Canadaspis Novozhilov in Orlov, 1960, one species of ?Perspicaris Briggs, 1977, three species of Tuzoia Walcott, 1912, and at least two species of Anomalocaris Whiteaves, 1892. A priapulid referable to Ottoia Walcott, 1911a, was also recovered. A comprehensive review of Tuzoia is given. Some specimens from Early Cambrian sections are replaced by hematite, resulting in iron staining similar to that in such other Early Cambrian soft-bodied faunas as the Kinzers Formation in Pennsylvania. Some taxa in the Comet Shale, and in other Early and Middle Cambrian soft-bodied faunas, have prodigious geographic ranges that spanned much of Laurentia and even other Cambrian cratons. Moreover, these taxa ranged across the Early-Middle Cambrian boundary relatively unscathed. This is in contrast to many trilobite taxa that had narrow geographic ranges in the Early Cambrian and high levels of extinction at the Early-Middle Cambrian boundary.

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A new soft-bodied fauna: The Pioche Formation of Nevada

  • Bruce S. Lieberman (a1)

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