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Improving the Achievement, Motivation, and Engagement of Students With ADHD: The Role of Personal Best Goals and Other Growth-Based Approaches

  • Andrew J. Martin (a1)
Abstract

In light of recent evidence suggesting the academic benefits of personal best (PB) goals for students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), this article explores practical approaches to implementing PB goals in the counselling and classroom context. Beginning with a brief summary of how and why PB goals impact academic outcomes and the relevance of this to students with ADHD, concrete steps to implementing PB goals are described. Following this, the broader concept of academic growth is discussed, along with some guidance as to how to operationalise growth approaches with students. Taken together, a greater focus on academically at-risk students’ personal trajectories is suggested as a potentially fruitful approach to enhancing their educational outcomes.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
address for correspondence: Andrew J. Martin, Faculty of Education and Social Work, A35 — Education Building, University of SydneyNSW 2006, Australia. Email: andrew.martin@sydney.edu.au
References
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Journal of Psychologists and Counsellors in Schools
  • ISSN: 2055-6365
  • EISSN: 2055-6373
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-psychologists-and-counsellors-in-schools
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