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Neuropsychological functioning in a patient with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2009

Roy C. Martin
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294
Marc W. Haut
Affiliation:
Department of Behavioral Medicine & Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of West Virginia, Morgantown, WV 26505 Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of West Virginia, Morgantown, WV 26505
Kevin Goeta-Kreisler
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of West Virginia, Morgantown, WV 26505
Deborah Blumenthal
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of West Virginia, Morgantown, WV 26505

Abstract

A 54-year-old woman with clinically diagnosed paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis secondary to adenocarcinoma of the lung is described. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed intact visual perception, visual construction, language, speeded processing, and verbal abstract reasoning in the presence of a severe anterograde amnesia for both verbal and visual information. A profound consolidation problem is discussed in view of other diseases of the mesial temporal lobes resulting in impaired consolidation of new material. (JINS, 1996, 2, 460–466.)

Type
Case Study
Copyright
Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 1996

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References

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