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Reduced Enhancement of Memory for Faces Encoded by Semantic and Socioemotional Processes in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 December 2019

Paeksoon Park
Affiliation:
Department of Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto606-8501, Japan Department of Psychiatry, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Kyoto606-8507, Japan Faculty of Comprehensive Rehabilitation, Kobegakuin University, Kobe, Hyogo651-2180, Japan
Hodaka Yamakado
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Kyoto606-8507, Japan
Ryosuke Takahashi
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Kyoto606-8507, Japan
Shikiho Dote
Affiliation:
Department of Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto606-8501, Japan
Shiho Ubukata
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Kyoto606-8507, Japan
Toshiya Murai
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Kyoto606-8507, Japan
Takashi Tsukiura
Affiliation:
Department of Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto606-8501, Japan
Corresponding

Abstract

Objectives:

Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) exhibit impaired semantic and socioemotional processes, which are thought to be related to dysfunctions in the fronto-striatal circuit. However, little is known about how the memory enhancement by these processes was reduced in PD. The present study investigated this issue.

Methods:

The retrieval performance of face memories encoded by semantic and socioemotional processes was compared between 24 PD patients and 24 age-matched healthy controls (HC). During encoding, participants were presented with unfamiliar faces and made judgment about them in three encoding conditions of semantic judgment (Semantics), attractiveness judgment (Attractiveness), and form judgment (Form). In Semantics, participants rated to what degree each face looked like an office worker, whereas in Attractiveness, participants rated how attractive each face was. The Form condition as a control required participants to judge the shape of each face. During retrieval after encoding, participants made old or new judgment for target and distracter faces.

Results:

In HC, the retrieval of faces encoded by Semantics and Attractiveness was significantly more accurate than that encoded by Form, whereas this memory enhancement was not identified in PD. In addition, individual scores in frontal lobe function and long-term memory correlated with the retrieval performance of memories encoded in Semantics and Attractiveness but not Form.

Conclusions:

These findings suggest that the processing of semantic and socioemotional signals conveyed from faces could be impaired in PD and that the impairment of these processes could decrease the enhancement of face memories by semantic and socioemotional elaborations.

Type
Regular Research
Copyright
Copyright © INS. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2019

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