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Relation between subjective fogginess and neuropsychological testing following concussion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 October 2004

GRANT L. IVERSON
Affiliation:
University of British Columbia and Riverview Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
MICHAEL GAETZ
Affiliation:
University of the Fraser Valley, Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada
MARK R. LOVELL
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
MICHAEL W. COLLINS
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between the subjective report of feeling foggy at one-week post concussion and acute neuropsychological outcome. The outcome variables were derived from a computerized neuropsychological screening battery, Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT). Participants were 110 high school students who sustained a sports-related concussion and were evaluated 5–10 days post injury (M = 6.8 days). Athletes were divided into two groups on the basis of self-reported fogginess. The first group reported no fogginess (n = 91), whereas the second group reported experiencing some degree of fogginess (n = 19) on a 6-point scale. The athletes with persistent fogginess experienced a large number of other post-concussion symptoms, compared to the athletes with no reported fogginess. In addition, the athletes with persistent fogginess had significantly slower reaction times, reduced memory performance, and slower processing speed. Thus, athletes with any degree of self-reported fogginess at one-week post injury are likely to have adverse effects from their concussions in multiple domains. (JINS, 2004, 10, 904–906.)

Type
BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Copyright
© 2004 The International Neuropsychological Society

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References

Collins, M.W., Field, M., Lovell, M.R., Iverson, G.L., Johnston, K.M., Maroon, J., & Fu, F.H. (2003). Relationship between post-concussion headache and neuropsychological test performance in high school athletes. American Journal of Sports Medicine, 31, 168173.Google Scholar
Lovell, M.R. & Collins, M.W. (1998). Neuropsychological assessment of the college football player. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 13, 926.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Maroon, J.C., Lovell, M.R., Norwig, J., Podell, K., Powell, J.W., & Hartl, R. (2000). Cerebral concussion in athletes: Evaluation and neuropsychological testing. Neurosurgery, 47, 659672.Google Scholar
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