Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-kmcbj Total loading time: 0.219 Render date: 2021-05-15T03:39:09.523Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Benthic Egg Masses and Larval Development of Amblyosyllis Speciosa (Polychaeta: Syllidae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2009

Bruno Pernet
Affiliation:
Department of Zoology and Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington, Box 351800, Seattle, WA 98195–1800, USA. E-mail: pernet@fhl.washington.edu

Extract

Eggs of the syllid polychaete Atnblyosyllis speciosa are deposited in benthic gelatinous masses. Embryos and larvae develop within these masses until about three weeks after fertilization, after which they crawl or swim away and metamorphose. Only one other syllid, the Mediterranean Syllides edentula, has been reported to form benthic egg masses.

While some syllid polychaetes spawn gametes freely into the water column where they are fertilized and develop without additional parental care, most species protect developing embryos in some fashion. Four modes of brood protection have been reported in the syllids. Protection of embryos within the ventral brood chamber of a planktonic adult is characteristic of members of the subfamily Autolytinae, and of some members of the Eusyllinae (Garwood, 1991). Physical attachment of embryos to the body of the maternal parent (external gestation) occurs in all members of the Exogoninae and in a few eusyllines (Heacox & Schroeder, 1978; Garwood, 1991). Viviparity is less common, having been reported in a few species in the subfamily Syllinae (Schroeder & Hermans, 1975; Ben-Eliahu, 1975) and in one exogonine (Pocklington & Hutcheson, 1983). Finally, the formation of benthic egg masses has been described in only one species, the eusylline Syllides edentula Claparède (Cognetti-Varriale, 1971).

In this study the benthic egg masses and development of another eusylline, Amblyosyllis speciosa Izuka, 1912, are described. In December 1995, at the Friday Harbor Laboratories (FHL), Washington, USA, five adult worms were found on a bivalve shell heavily infested with the boring sponge Cliona sp. Additional specimens and egg masses were collected in June 1996 and April-June 1997 from encrusting sponges on the FHL breakwater.

Type
Short Communications
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 1998

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Ben-Eliahu, M.N., 1975. Polychaete cryptofauna from rims of similar intertidal vermetid reefs on the Mediterranean coast of Israel and in the Gulf of Eilat: Syllinae and Eusyllinae (Polychaeta: Syllidae). Israel Journal of Zoology, 25, 158.Google Scholar
Cognetti-Varriale, A.-M., 1971. Sur un syllidien des eaux polluees du Port de Livourne:Syllides edentula Claparède. Cahiers de Biologie Marine, 12, 111115.Google Scholar
Dorsey, J.H., 1978. A new species of Syllides (Polychaeta: Syllidae) with notes on Amblyosyllis speciosa Izuka from San Clemente Island, California. Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Science, 77, 2227.Google Scholar
Eckelbarger, K.J., 1984. Ultrastructure of spermatogenesis in the reef-building polychaete Phragmatopoma lapidosa (Sabellariidae) with special reference to acrosome morphogenesis. Journal of Ultrastructure Research, 89, 146164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garwood, P.R., 1991. Reproduction and classification of the family Syllidae. Ophelia 5, supplement, 8187.Google Scholar
Heacox, A.E. & Schroeder, P.C., 1978. First report of brooding in Syllides japonica Imajima (Syllidae: Polychaeta). Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Science, 77, 142144.Google Scholar
Imajima, M., 1966. The Syllidae (polychaetous annelids) from lapan. III. Eusyllinae. Publications of the Seto Marine Biological Laboratory, 14, 85116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pettibone, M., 1963. Marine polychaete worms of the New England region. 1. Aphroditidae through Trochochaetidae. United States National Museum Bulletin, 227, 1356.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pocklington, P. & Hutcheson, M.S., 1983. New record of viviparity for the dominant benthic invertebrate Exogone hebes (Polychaeta: Syllidae) from the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 11, 239244.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schiedges, K.L., 1979. Reproductive biology and ontogenesis in the polychaete genus Autolytus (Annelida: Syllidae). Marine Biology, 54, 239250.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schroeder, P.C. & Hermans, Co., 1975. Annelida: Polychaeta. In Reproduction of marine invertebrates. Vol. 3. Annelids and echiurans (ed. A.C., Giese and J.S., Pearse), pp. 1213. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Benthic Egg Masses and Larval Development of Amblyosyllis Speciosa (Polychaeta: Syllidae)
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Benthic Egg Masses and Larval Development of Amblyosyllis Speciosa (Polychaeta: Syllidae)
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Benthic Egg Masses and Larval Development of Amblyosyllis Speciosa (Polychaeta: Syllidae)
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *