Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-7xspw Total loading time: 0.448 Render date: 2022-10-07T05:25:54.061Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Ontogeny of the brain in oval squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana (Cephalopoda: Loliginidae) during the post-hatching phase

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 March 2013

Shiori Kobayashi
Affiliation:
Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Engineering and Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan
Chitoshi Takayama
Affiliation:
Department of Molecular Anatomy, Graduate School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan
Yuzuru Ikeda*
Affiliation:
Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Engineering and Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: Y. Ikeda, Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Engineering and Science, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan email: ikeda@sci.u-ryukyu.ac.jp

Abstract

Among invertebrates, cephalopods have one of the most well-organized nervous systems. However, with respect to the ontogeny of the nervous system, the post-embryonic development of the cephalopod brain has only been documented for a few species. Here, we investigated the development of the brain of captive oval squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana during the post-hatching phase. The central part of the brain of the oval squid is divided into four main regions, namely, the supraoesophageal, anterior suboesophageal, middle suboesophageal, and posterior suboesophageal masses, each consisting of several lobes. At various ages in juvenile squid, the total volume of the central part of the brain (except the optic lobe) is significantly correlated with its body size, indicated by mantle length and wet body weight. The vertical lobe, superior frontal lobe, and anterior subesophageal mass drastically increase in relative volume as the squid grows. In contrast, the middle suboesophageal mass and posterior suboesophageal mass do not increase in volume with increasing squid age and body size. The effects of these results have been discussed in relation to the onset of squid behaviours during post-hatching.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 2013 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

Abbott, N.J., Williamson, R. and Maddock, L. (1995) Cephalopod neurobiology: neuroscience studies in squid, octopus and cuttlefish. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Budelmann, B.U. (1995) The cephalopod nervous system: what evolution has made of the molluscan design. In Breidbach, O.Kutsch, W. (eds) The nervous system of invertebrates: an evolutionary and comparative approach. Basel: Birkhäuser Verlag, pp. 115138.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Budelmann, B.U. and Tu, Y. (1997) The statocyst-oculomotor reflex of cephalopods and vestibulo-oculomotor reflex of vertebrates: A tabular comparison. Vie et Milleu. 47, 9599.Google Scholar
Boletzky, S.V. and Hanlon, R.T. (1983) A review of laboratory maintenance, rearing and culture of cephalopod mollusks. Memoirs of the National Museum of Victoria 44, 147187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boyle, P.R. (1986) Neural control of cephalopod behavior. In Willows, A.O.D. (ed.) The Mollusca, Volume 9, Neurobiology and behavior, Part 2. London: Academic Press, pp. 85115.Google Scholar
Boycott, B.B. (1961) The functional organization of the brain of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, B 153, 503534.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brandstätter, R. and Kotrschal, K. (1990) Brain growth patterns in four European cyprinid fish species (Cyprinidae, Teleostei): roach (Rutilus rutilus), bream (Abramis brama), common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and sabre carp (Pelecus cultratus). Brain, Behavior and Evolution 35, 195211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cash, D. and Carew, T.J. (1989) A quantitative analysis of the development of the central nervous system in juvenile Aplysia californica. Journal of Neurobiology 20, 2547.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dickel, L., Chichery, M.P. and Chichery, R. (1997) Post-embryonic maturation of the vertical lobe complex and early development of predatory behavior in the cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis). Neurobiology of Learning and Memory 67, 150160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dickel, L., Chichery, M.P. and Chichery, R. (2001) Increase of learning abilities and maturation of the vertical lobe complex during postembryonic development in the cuttlefish, Sepia. Developmental Psychobiology 40, 9298.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gilbert, D.L., Adelman, W.J. and Arnold, J.M. (1990) Squid as experimental animals. New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gleadall, I.G. (1990) Higher motor function in the brain of octopus: the anterior basal lobe and its analogies with the vertebrate basal ganglia. Annals of Applied Information & Science 16, 130.Google Scholar
Hobbs, M.J. and Young, J.Z. (1973) A cephalopod cerebellum. Brain Research 55, 424430.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hochner, B., Shomrat, T. and Fiorito, G. (2006) The octopus: a model for a comparative analysis of the evolution of learning and memory mechanisms. Biological Bulletin. Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hale 210, 308317.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kier, W.M. (1996) Muscle development in Sequoia: ultrastructural differentiation of a specialized muscle Fiber Type. Journal of Morphology 229, 271288.3.0.CO;2-1>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
LaRoe, E.T. (1971) The culture and maintenance of the loliginid squids Sepioteuthis sepioidea and Doryteuthis plei. Marine Biology 9, 925.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lee, P.G., Turk, P.E., Yang, W.T. and Hanlon, R.T. (1994) Biological characteristics and biomedical applications of the squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana cultured through multiple generations. Biological Bulletin. Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hale 186, 328341.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lande, R. (1979) Quantitative genetic analysis of multivariate evolution, applied to brain: body size allometry. Evolution 33, 402416.Google ScholarPubMed
Maddock, L. and Young, J.Z. (1987) Quantitative differences among the brains of cephalopods. Journal of Zoology 212, 739767.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Messenger, J.B. (1973) Learning performance and brain structure: a study in development. Brain Research 58, 519528.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Messenger, J.B. (1979) The nervous system of Loligo. IV. The peduncle and olfactory lobes. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London 285, 275309.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moynihan, M. and Rodaniche, A.F. (1982) The behavior and natural history of the Caribbean reef squid Sepioteuthis sepioidea. Berlin and Hamburg: Verlag Paul Parey.Google Scholar
Nixon, M, and Mangold, K. (1996) The early life of Octopus vulgaris (Chephalopoda: Octopodidae) in the plankton and at settlement: a change in life style. Journal of Zoology 239, 301327.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nixon, M. and Young, J.Z. (2003) The brains and lives of cephalopods. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Packard, A. (1972) Cephalopods and fish: The limits of convergence. Biological Reviews 47, 241307.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Power, M.E. (1952) A quantitative study of the growth of the central nervous system of a holometabolous insect, Drosophila melanogaster. Journal of Morphology 91, 389411.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Segawa, S. (1987) Life history of the oval squid, Sepioteuthis lessoniana in Kominato and adjacent waters central Honshu, Japan. Journal of the Tokyo University of Fisheries 74, 67105.Google Scholar
Shigeno, S., Tsuchiya, K. and Segawa, S. (2001a) Embryonic and paralarval development of the central nervous system of the loliginid squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana). Journal of Comparative Neurology 437, 449475.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shigeno, S., Kidokoro, H., Thuchiya, K, Segawa, S. and Tamamoto, M. (2001b) Development of the brain in the oegopsid squid, Todarodes pacificus to juvenile. Zoologial Science 18, 10811096.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sugimoto, C. and Ikeda, Y. (2012) Ontogeny of schooling behavior in the oval squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana. Fisheries Science 78, 287294.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wells, M.J. and Wells, J (1969) Pituitary analogue in the octopus. Nature 222, 293294.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yamazaki, A., Yoshida, M. and Uematsu, K. (2002) Post-hatching development of the brain in Octopus ocellatus. Zoologial Science 19, 763771.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Young, J.Z. (1958) Effects of removal of various amounts of vertical lobes on visual discrimination by octopus. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London 149, 41462.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Young, J.Z. (1965) The organization of a memory system. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London 163, 285320.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Young, J.Z. (1971) The anatomy of the nervous system of Octopus vulgaris. Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
Young, J.Z. (1974) The central nervous system of Loligo. I. The optic lobe. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 267, 263302.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Young, J.Z. (1975) The nervous system of Loligo II. Suboesophageal centres. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 267, 101167.Google Scholar
Young, J.Z. (1977) The nervous system of Loligo III. Higher motor centres: The basal supraoesophageal lobes. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 267, 351398.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Young, J.Z. (1991) Computation in the learning system of cephalopods. Biological Bulletin. Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hale 180, 200208.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Ontogeny of the brain in oval squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana (Cephalopoda: Loliginidae) during the post-hatching phase
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Ontogeny of the brain in oval squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana (Cephalopoda: Loliginidae) during the post-hatching phase
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Ontogeny of the brain in oval squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana (Cephalopoda: Loliginidae) during the post-hatching phase
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *