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A laser-customizable insole for selective topical oxygen delivery to diabetic foot ulcers

  • H. Jiang (a1) (a2), M. Ochoa (a1) (a2), V. Jain (a2) (a3) and B. Ziaie (a1) (a2)
Abstract

In this work, we present an oxygen-releasing insole to treat diabetic foot ulcers. The insole consists of two layers of polydimethylsiloxane: the top layer has selective laser-machined areas (to tune oxygen permeability) targeting the ulcerated foot region, while the bottom layer provides structural support and incorporates a chamber for oxygen storage. When loaded with a pressure of 150 kPa (average value for standing/walking), the insole is able to release oxygen at a rate of 1.8 mmHg/min/cm2. At lower sitting pressures, the delivery rate persists at 0.092 mmHg/min/cm2, raising the oxygen level to an optimal healing value (50 mmHg) for a 2 × 2 cm2 wound within 150 min.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Address all correspondence to B. Ziaie at bziaie@purdue.edu
References
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MRS Communications
  • ISSN: 2159-6859
  • EISSN: 2159-6867
  • URL: /core/journals/mrs-communications
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