Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-66d7dfc8f5-tqznl Total loading time: 0.229 Render date: 2023-02-09T05:55:11.091Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Cigarette Smoking and Food and Nutrient Intakes in Relation to Coronary Heart Disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 December 2007

R. L. Thompson
Affiliation:
Preventive Cardiology, Medicine 1, University of Southampton, Royal South Hants Hospital, Southampton SO9 4PE
B. M. Margetts
Affiliation:
Institute of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Southampton SO9 3TU
D. A. Wood
Affiliation:
Preventive Cardiology, Medicine 1, University of Southampton, Royal South Hants Hospital, Southampton SO9 4PE
A. A. Jackson
Affiliation:
Institute of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Southampton SO9 3TU
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1992

References

REFERENCES

Beynen, A. C., Hermus, R. J. J. & Hautvast, J. G. A. J. (1980). A mathematical relationship between the fatty acid composition of the diet and that of adipose tissue in man. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 33, 8185.Google Scholar
Bolton-Smith, C. & Milne, A. C. (1991). Food frequency v. weighed intake data in Scottish men. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 50, 35A.Google Scholar
Bolton-Smith, C., Woodward, M., Brown, C. A., Smith, W. C. S. & Tunstall-Pedoe, H. (1991). Nutrient intakes from current, ex-and never smokers: results from the Scottish Heart Health Study. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 50, 36A.Google Scholar
Bosse, R., Garvey, A. J. & Costa, P. T. (1980). Predictors of weight change following smoking cessation. International Journal of Addictive Behaviour 15, 969991.Google Scholar
Bridges, R. B., Chow, C. K. & Rehm, S. R. (1990). Micronutrient status and immune function in smokers. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 587, 218231.Google Scholar
Cade, J. E. & Margetts, B. M. (1990). Smoking and diet: is the diet of smokers different? Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 49, 41A.Google Scholar
Cade, J. E. & Margetts, B. M. (1991). The relationship between diet and smoking—is the diet of smokers different? Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 45, 270272.Google Scholar
Committee on Medical Aspects of Food Policy. Diet and cardiovascular disease (1984). Department of Health and Social Security Report on Health and Social Subjects no. 28. London: HMSO.Google Scholar
Cook, D. G., Shaper, A. G., Pocock, S. J. & Kussick, S. J. (1986). Giving up smoking and the risk of heart attacks. Lancet ii, 13761380.Google Scholar
Craig, W. Y., Palomaki, G. E. & Haddow, J. E. (1989). Cigarette smoking and serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations: an analysis of published data. British Medical Journal 298, 784788.Google Scholar
Dallosso, H. M. & James, W. P. T. (1984). The role of smoking in the regulation of energy balance. International Journal of Obesity 8, 365375.Google Scholar
Department of Health (1991 a). On the State of the Public Health: the annual report of the chief medical officer of the Department of Health for the year 1990. London: HMSO.Google Scholar
Department of Health (1991 b). Dietary reference values for food energy and nutrients for the United Kingdom. Report on Health and Social Subjects no. 41. London: HMSO.Google Scholar
Diplock, A. T. (1991). Antioxidant nutrients and disease prevention: an overview. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 53, 189S193S.Google Scholar
Doll, R. & Peto, R. (1976). Mortality in relation to smoking; 20 years' observations on male British doctors. British Medical Journal ii, 15251536.Google Scholar
Duthie, G. G., Wahle, K. W. J. & James, W. P. T. (1989). Oxidants, antioxidants and cardiovascular disease. Nutrition Research Reviews 2, 5162.Google Scholar
Feher, M. D., Rampling, M. W., Brown, J., Robinson, R., Richmond, W., Cholerton, S., Bain, B. J. & Sever, P. S. (1990). Acute changes in atherogenic and thrombogenic factors with cessation of smoking. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 83, 146148.Google Scholar
Fehily, A. M., Phillips, K. M. & Yarnell, J. W. G. (1984). Diet, smoking, social class, and body mass index in the Caerphilly Heart Disease Study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 40, 827833.Google Scholar
Friedman, G. D., Siegelaub, A. B., Dales, L. G. & Seltzer, C. C. (1979). Characteristics predictive of coronary heart disease in ex-smokers before they stopped smoking: comparison with persistent smokers and non-smokers. Journal of Chronic Diseases 32, 175190.Google Scholar
Fulton, M., Thomson, M., Elton, R. A., Brown, S., Wood, D. A. & Oliver, M. F., (1988). Cigarette smoking, social class and nutrient intake: relevance to coronary heart disease. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 42, 797803.Google Scholar
Gregory, J., Foster, K., Tyler, H. & Wiseman, M. (1990). The Dietary and Nutritional Survey of British Adults. London: HMSO.Google Scholar
Grimble, R. F. (1990). Nutrition and cytokine action. Nutrition Research Reviews 3, 193210.Google Scholar
Grunberg, N. E. (1982). The effects of nicotine and cigarette smoking on food consumption and taste preferences. Addictive Behaviors 7, 317331.Google Scholar
Hall, S. M., McGee, R., Tunstall, C., Duffy, J. & Benowitz, N. (1989). Changes in food intake and activity after quitting smoking. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 57, 8186.Google Scholar
Harats, D., Ben-Naim, M., Dabach, Y., Hollander, G., Stein, O. & Stein, Y. (1989). Cigarette smoking renders LDL susceptible to peroxidative modification and enhanced metabolism by macrophages. Atherosclerosis 79, 245252.Google Scholar
Harats, D., Ben-Naim, M., Dabach, Y., Hollander, G., Havivi, E., Stein, O.& Stein, Y. (1990). Effect of vitamin C and E supplementation on susceptibility of plasma lipoproteins to peroxidation induced by acute smoking. Atherosclerosis 85, 4754.Google Scholar
Haste, F. M., Brooke, O. G., Anderson, H. R., Bland, J. M., Shaw, A., Griffin, J. & Peacock, J. L. (1990). Nutrient intakes during pregnancy: observations on the influence of smoking and social class. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 51, 2936.Google Scholar
Hellerstedt, W. L., Jeffery, R. W. & Murray, D. M. (1990). The association between alcohol intake and adiposity in the general population. American Journal of Epidemiology 132, 594611.Google Scholar
Herbeth, B., Chavance, M., Musse, N., Mejean, L. & Vernhes, G. (1990). Determinants of plasma retinol, β-carotene and α-tocopherol. American Journal of Epidemiology 132, 394396.Google Scholar
Hofstetter, A., Schutz, Y., Jéquier, E. & Wahren, J. (1986). Increased 24-hour energy expenditure in cigarette smokers. New England Journal of Medicine 314, 7982.Google Scholar
Kallner, A. B., Hartmann, D. & Hornig, D. H. (1981). On the requirements of ascorbic acid in men: steady state turnover and body pool in smokers. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 34, 13471355.Google Scholar
Kershbaum, A., Bellet, S., Jimenez, J. & Feinberg, L. J. (1966). Differences in effects of cigar and cigarette smoking on free fatty acid mobilization and catecholamine excretion. Journal of the American Medical Association 195, 10951098.Google Scholar
Klesges, R. C., Eck, L. H., Isbell, T. R., Fulliton, W. & Hanson, C. L. (1990). Smoking status: effects on the dietary intake, physical activity, and body fat of adult men. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 51, 784789.Google Scholar
Lapidus, L., Bengtsson, C., Larsson, B., Pennert, K., Rybo, E. & Sjöström, L. (1984). Distribution of adipose tissue and risk of cardiovascular disease and death: a 12-year follow-up of participants in the population study of women in Gothenburg, Sweden. British Medical Journal 289, 12571261.Google Scholar
Larkin, F. A., Basiotis, P. P., Riddick, H. A., Sykes, K. E. & Pao, E. M. (1990). Dietary patterns of women smokers and non-smokers. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 90, 230236.Google Scholar
Larsson, B., Svärdsudd, K., Welin, L., Wilhelmsen, L., Björntorp, P. & Tibblin, G. (1984). Abdominal adipose tissue distribution, obesity, and risk of cardiovascular disease and death: 13-year follow-up of participants in the study of men born in 1913. British Medical Journal 288, 14011404.Google Scholar
Lee, P. (1988). Misclassification of Smoking Habits and Passive Smoking. A Review of the Evidence. Berlin: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
Luc, G. & Fruchart, J.-C. (1991). Oxidation of lipoproteins and atherosclerosis. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 53, 206S209S.Google Scholar
Machlin, L. J. & Bendich, A. (1987). Free radical tissue damage: protective role of antioxidant nutrients. FASEB Journal 1, 441445.Google Scholar
Manson, J. E., Colditz, G. A., Stampfer, M. J., Willett, W. C., Rosner, B., Monson, R. R., Speizer, F. E. & Hennekens, C. H. (1990). A prospective study of obesity and risk of coronary heart disease in women. New England Journal of Medicine 322, 882889.Google Scholar
Meade, T. W., Imeson, J. & Stirling, Y. (1987). Effects of changes in smoking and other characteristics on clotting factors and the risk of ischaemic heart disease. Lancet ii, 986988.Google Scholar
Muscat, J. E., Harris, R. E., Haley, N. J. & Wynder, E. L. (1991). Cigarette smoking and plasma cholesterol. American Heart Journal 121, 141147.Google Scholar
National Advisory Committee on Nutrition Education (1983). Proposals for Nutritional Guidelines for Health Education in Britain. London: Health Education Council.Google Scholar
Perkins, K. A., Epstein, L. H., Stiller, R. L., Sexton, J. E.Fernstrom, M. H., Jacob, R. G. & Solberg, R. (1990). Metabolic effects of nicotine after consumption of a meal in smokers and non-smokers. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 52, 228233.Google Scholar
Phillips, A., Shaper, A. G. & Whincup, P. H. (1989). Association between serum albumin and mortality from cardiovascular disease, cancer and other causes. Lancet ii, 14341436.Google Scholar
Quensel, M., Söderström, A., Agardh, C. D. & Nilsson-Ehle, P. (1989). High-density lipoprotein concentrations afer cessation of smoking: the importance of alterations in diet. Atherosclerosis 75, 189193.Google Scholar
Riemersma, R. A., Wood, D. A., Maclntyre, C. C. A., Elton, R. A., Gey, K. F. & Oliver, M. F. (1991). Risk of angina pectoris and plasma concentrations of vitamins A, C, and E and carotene. Lancet 337, 15.Google Scholar
Robinson, S. M. & York, D. A. (1988). Cigarette smoking and the thermic responses to isocaloric meals of varying composition and palatability. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 42, 551559.Google Scholar
Rodin, J. (1987). Weight change following smoking cessation: the role of food intake and exercise. Addictive Behaviors 12, 303317.Google Scholar
Scheffler, E., Huber, L., Frühbis, J., Schulz, I., Ziegler, R. & Alois Dresel, H. (1990). Alteration of plasma lowdensity lipoprotein from smokers. Atherosclerosis 82, 261265.Google Scholar
Secretary of State for Health (1991). Health of the Nation. London: HMSO.Google Scholar
Shaper, A. G., Pocock, S. J., Walker, M., Phillips, A. N., Whitehead, T. P. & MacFarlane, P. W. (1985). Risk factors for ischaemic heart disease: the prospective phase of the British Regional Heart Study. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 39, 197209.Google Scholar
Shimokata, H., Muller, D. C. & Andres, R. (1989). Studies in the distribution of body fat. 3. Effects of cigarette smoking. Journal of the American Medical Association 261, 11691173.Google Scholar
Smith, J. & Hodges, R. (1987). Serum levels of vitamin C in relation to dietary and supplemental intake of vitamin C in smokers and non-smokers. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 498, 144151.Google Scholar
Stamford, B. A., Matter, S., Fell, R. D. & Papanek, P. (1986). Effects of smoking cessation on weight gain, metabolic rate, caloric consumption, and blood lipids. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 43, 486494.Google Scholar
Steinberg, D., Parthasarathy, S., Carew, T. E., Khoo, J. C. & Witztum, J. L. (1989). Beyond cholesterol. Modifications of low-density lipoprotein that increase its atherogenicity. New England Journal of Medicine 320, 915924.Google Scholar
Strain, J. J., Thompson, K. A. & Barker, M. E. (1991). Dietary intakes of smokers and non-smokers in the Northern Ireland population. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 50, 101A.Google Scholar
Stryker, W. S., Kaplan, L. A., Stein, E. A., Stampfer, M. J., Sober, A. & Willett, W. C. (1988). The relation of diet, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption to plasma beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol levels. American Journal of Epidemiology 127, 283296.Google Scholar
Stubbe, I., Eskilsson, J. & Nilsson-Ehle, P. (1982). High-density lipoprotein concentrations increase after stopping smoking. British Medical Journal 284, 15111513.Google Scholar
Subar, A. F., Harlan, L. C. & Mattson, M. E. (1990). Food and nutrient intake differences between smokers and non-smokers in the US. American Journal of Public Health 80, 13231329.Google Scholar
Sutton, S. R., Russell, M. A. H., Iyer, R., Feyerabend, C. & Saloojee, Y. (1982). Relationship between cigarette yields, puffing patterns, and smoke intake: evidence for tar compensation? British Medical Journal 285, 600606.Google Scholar
Townsend, J., Wilkes, H., Haines, A. & Jarvis, M. (1991). Adolescent smokers seen in general practice: health, lifestyle, physical measurements, and response to antismoking advice. British Medical Journal 303, 947950.Google Scholar
Troisi, R. J., Heinold, J. W., Vokonas, P. S. & Weiss, S. T. (1991). Cigarette smoking, dietary intake, and physical activity: effects on body fat distribution – the Normative Aging Study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 53, 11041111.Google Scholar
Whichelow, M. J. (1989). Choice of spread by a random sample of the British population. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 43, 110.Google Scholar
Whichelow, M. J. & Erzinglioglu, S. W. (1990). Comparison of the diets of smokers and non-smokers. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 49, 42A.Google Scholar
Whichelow, M. J., Golding, J. F. & Treasure, F. P. (1988). Comparison of some dietary habits of smokers and non-smokers. British Journal of Addiction 83, 295304.Google Scholar
Williamson, D. F., Madans, J., Anda, R. F., Kleinman, J. C., Giovino, G. A. & Byers, T. (1991). Smoking cessation and severity of weight gain in a national cohort. New England Journal of Medicine 324, 739745.Google Scholar
Yokode, M., Kita, T., Arai, H., Kawai, C., Narumiya, S. & Fujiwara, M. (1988). Cholesteryl ester accumulation in macrophages incubated with low-density lipoprotein pretreated with cigarette smoke extract. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 85, 23442348.Google Scholar
You have Access
29
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Cigarette Smoking and Food and Nutrient Intakes in Relation to Coronary Heart Disease
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Cigarette Smoking and Food and Nutrient Intakes in Relation to Coronary Heart Disease
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Cigarette Smoking and Food and Nutrient Intakes in Relation to Coronary Heart Disease
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *