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The effect of density of first-stage larvae of Elaphostrongylus rangiferi on the infection rate in the snail intermediate host

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2009

Arne Skorping
Affiliation:
University of Tromsø, Department of Ecology, P.O. Box 3085 Guleng, 9001 Tromsø, Norway

Summary

The relationship between the density of lst-stage larvae of Elaphostrongylus rangiferi on the infection rate into the gastropod intermediate host, Arianta arbustorum, was studied experimentally. Within a range of densities between 30 and 1100 larvae/cm2 the experimental data gave a good fit to the conventional epidemiological assumption of direct proportionality between the net infection rate and the density of infective stages. The instantaneous rate of infection was estimated to be about 1 × 10−3/larvae/snail/2 h. At higher densities (> 1100 larvae/cm2) the instantaneous rate of infection showed a densitydependent decline.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1988

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References

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The effect of density of first-stage larvae of Elaphostrongylus rangiferi on the infection rate in the snail intermediate host
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