Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-vvt5l Total loading time: 0.782 Render date: 2022-06-29T21:51:28.513Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

Genetic relatedness as a determinant of predisposition to Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura infection

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2009

L. Chan
Affiliation:
Parasite Epidemiology Research Group, Department of Biology, Imperial College, London SW7 2BB, U.K.
D. A. P. Bundy
Affiliation:
Parasite Epidemiology Research Group, Department of Biology, Imperial College, London SW7 2BB, U.K.
S. P. Kan
Affiliation:
Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 59100 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Summary

The present study examines the role of host genetics in predisposition to Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura infection, by comparing the associations between age-standardized infection intensities of parents and their children (genetically related), with age-standardized infection intensities of parents alone (not related), within families previously demonstrated to exhibit familial predisposition. The lack of a consistent trend in infection intensity associations within families, in particular the lack of a stronger association between parents and their children than between unrelated parents, suggests that host genetic factors are not a major determinant of infection status. If there is a genetic basis for predisposition, then the data suggest that the effects of this genetic basis are overwhelmed by other, environmental or behavioural features of the family household.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1994

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Abel, L., Demenais, F., Prata, A., Souza, A. E. & Dessein, A. (1991). Evidence for the segregation of a major gene in human susceptibility/resistance to infection by Schistosoma mansoni. American Journal of Human Genetics 48, 959–70.Google Scholar
Bundy, D. A. p. (1988). Population ecology of intestinal helminth infections in human communities. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, B 321, 405–20.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bundy, D. A. P., Cooper, E. S., Thompson, D. E., Didier, J. M., Anderson, R. M. & Simmons, I. (1987). Predisposition to T. trichiura infection in humans. Epidemiology and Infection 98, 6571.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bundy, D. A. P. & Medley, G. F. (1992). Immunoepidemiology of human geohelminthiasis: ecological and immunological determinants of worm burden. Parasitology 104, S10519.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bundy, D. A. P., Thompson, D. E., Cooper, E. S. & Blanchard, J. (1985). Rate of expulsion of Trichuris trichiura with multiple and single dose regimens of albendazole. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 79, 641–4.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chan, L., Kan, S. P. & Bundy, D. A. P. (1992). The effect of repeated chemotherapy on age-related predisposition to Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura infection. Parasitology 104, 371–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chan, L., Bundy, D. A. P. & Kan, S. P. (1993). Aggregation and predisposition to Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura at the familial level. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (in the Press.)Google Scholar
Forrester, J. E., Scott, M. E., Bundy, D. A. P. & Golden, M. H. N. (1988). Clustering of Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura infections within households. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 82, 282–8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Forrester, J. E., Scott, M. E., Bundy, D. A. P. & Golden, M. H. N. (1990). Predisposition of individuals and families in Mexico to heavy infection with Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 84, 272–6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hall, A., Anwar, K. & Tomkins, A. M. (1992). Intensity of reinfection with Ascaris lumbricoides and its implications for parasite control. Lancet 339, 1253–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Haswell-Elkins, M. R., Elkins, D. B. & Anderson, R. M. (1987). Evidence for predisposition in humans to infection with Ascaris, hookworm, Enterobius and Trichuris in a South Indian fishing community. Parasitology 94, 323–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holland, C. V., Asaolu, S. O., Crompton, D. W. T., Stoddart, R. C., Macdonald, R. & Torimito, S. E. A. (1989). The epidemiology of Ascaris lumbricoides and other soil-transmitted helminths in primary school children from Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Parasitology 99, 275–85.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kennedy, M. W. (1989). Genetic control of the immune repertoire in nematode infections. Parasitology Today 5, 316–24.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Keymer, A. & Pagel, M. (1990). Predisposition to helminth infection. In Hookworm Disease: Current Status and New Directions (ed. Schad, G. A. & Warren, K. S.), pp. 177209. London: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
Southwood, T. R. E. (1978). Ecological Methods with Particular Reference to the Study of Insect Populations. London: Chapman & Hall.Google Scholar
Wakelin, D. (1985). Genetic control of immunity to helminth infections. Parasitology Today 1, 1723.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
31
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Genetic relatedness as a determinant of predisposition to Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura infection
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Genetic relatedness as a determinant of predisposition to Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura infection
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Genetic relatedness as a determinant of predisposition to Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura infection
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *