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Estimating the number of multiple-species geohelminth infections in human communities

  • M. Booth (a1) and D. A. P. Bundy (a1)
Abstract
SUMMARY

Infections with Ascaris lumbricoides, Triclmris trichiura and the hookworm species are often found in the same communities and individuals. Hosts infected by more than one species are potentially at risk of morbidity associated with each infection. This paper describes the use of a probabilistic model to predict the prevalence of multiple-species infections in communities for which only overall prevalence data exist. The model is tested against field data, using log-linear analysis, and is found to be more effective at estimating the numbers of multiple infections involving hookworms than those involving only A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura. This latter combination of infections is found, in half the communities examined, to be more common than expected by chance. An age-stratified analysis reveals that the degree of interaction between these two infections does not alter significantly with age in the child age classes of a Malaysian population.

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Parasitology
  • ISSN: 0031-1820
  • EISSN: 1469-8161
  • URL: /core/journals/parasitology
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