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Sharon Inkelas and Draga Zec (eds.) (1990). The phonology—syntax connection. Chicago: Chicago University Press. Pp. xv + 428.

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 October 2008

Geert Booij
Affiliation:
Free University, Amsterdam

Abstract

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Review
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1992

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References

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Sharon Inkelas and Draga Zec (eds.) (1990). The phonology—syntax connection. Chicago: Chicago University Press. Pp. xv + 428.
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Sharon Inkelas and Draga Zec (eds.) (1990). The phonology—syntax connection. Chicago: Chicago University Press. Pp. xv + 428.
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