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Introduction: Feminist Security Studies and Feminist Political Economy: Crossing Divides and Rebuilding Bridges

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 June 2015

Juanita Elias*
Affiliation:
University of Warwick

Extract

The essays here reflect on the need to rebuild bridges between two key strands of feminist International Relations (IR) scholarship: feminist security studies (FSS) and feminist (international) political economy (FPE/FIPE). As many of the contributions to this section point out, feminist IR scholarship has long emphasized how gender relations and identities are constituted globally in relation to processes of militarization, securitization, globalization, and governance. In more recent years, however, feminist IR scholarship has come to be dominated by a concern with security (Prügl 2011). Of course, FPE scholarship has continued to provide critical accounts of the gendered nature of global production, work, and financial crises (among other issues). But it is notable that, in doing so, much FPE scholarship has tended to avoid questions of security and/or violence. This CP section, then, looks to the growing divide between FSS and FPE with all of the contributors seeking to analyse how these two traditions of feminist scholarship might be reintegrated and why this reintegration is important.

Type
Critical Perspectives on Gender and Politics
Copyright
Copyright © The Women and Politics Research Section of the American Political Science Association 2015 

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References

REFERENCES

Enloe, Cynthia. 2004. The Curious Feminist: Searching for Women in a New Age of Empire. Berkley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Prügl, Elisabeth. 2011. “Feminist Iinternational RelationsPolitics & Gender 7 (1): 111–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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