Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Women's Political Parties in Europe

  • Kimberly Cowell-Meyers (a1)
Abstract

In representative democracies, political parties organize the public will, giving expression to political differences in society (see Katz and Mair 1995; Klingemann, Hofferbert, and Budge 1994; Sartori 1967). Parties can also deepen democracy by broadening the connections between representatives and constituents, helping to hold political institutions accountable and increasing the participation of previously marginalized groups (see Costain 2005; Kitschelt 1993; Shugart 1994; Kittilson and Tate 2005; Young 2000).

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Women's Political Parties in Europe
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Women's Political Parties in Europe
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Women's Political Parties in Europe
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Lisa Baldez . 2003. “Women's Movements and Democratic Transition in Chile, Brazil, East Germany, and Poland.” Comparative Politics 35 (3): 253–72.

Kenneth T. Andrews 2001. “Social Movements and Policy Implementation: The Mississippi Civil Rights Movement and the War on Poverty, 1965 to 1971.” American Sociological Review 66 (1): 7195.

Elizabeth A. Armstrong , and Mary Bernstein . 2008. “Culture, Power, and Institutions: A Multi-Institutional Politics Approach to Social Movements.” Sociological Theory 26 (1): 7499.

Mona Lena Krook . 2009. Quotas for Women in Politics: Gender and Candidate Selection Reform Worldwide. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Richard Matland , and Kathleen Montgomery , eds. 2003. Women's Access to Political Power in Post-Communist Europe. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Karen Beckwith . 2000. “Beyond Compare? Women's Movements in Comparative Perspective.” European Journal of Political Research 37 (4): 431–68.

Anne Costain . 1981. “Representing Women: The Transition from Social Movement to Interest Group.” The Western Political Quarterly 34 (1): 100–13.

Jane Mansbridge . 1999. “Should Blacks Represent Blacks and Women Represent Women? A Contingent ‘Yes.’Journal of Politics 61(3): 628–57.

Kimberly Cowell-Meyers . 2011. “A Collarette on a Donkey: The Northern Ireland Women's Coalition and the Limitations of Contagion Theory.” Political Studies 59 (2): 411–31.

Lena Dominelli , and Gudrun Jonsdottir . 1988. “Feminist Political Organization in Iceland: Some Reflections on the Experience of Kwenna Frambothid.” Feminist Review 30: 3660.

Robert Harmel , and John Robertson . 1985. “Formation and Success of New Parties.” International Political Science Review 6 (3): 501–23.

Robert Harmel , and Lars Svasand . 1997. “The Influence of New Parties on Old Parties’ Platforms: The Cases of Progress Parties and Conservative Parties of Denmark and Norway.” Party Politics 3 (3): 315–40.

Simon Hug . 2001. Altering Party Systems: Strategic Behavior and the Emergence of New Political Parties in Western Democracies. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Piero Ignazi . 1992. “The Silent Counter-Revolution: Hypotheses on the Emergence of Extreme Right Wing Parties in Europe.” European Journal of Political Research 22 (1): 334.

John Ishiyama . 2003. “Women's Parties in Post-Communist Politics.” East European Politics and Societies 17 (2): 266304.

Herbert Kitschelt . 1993. “Social Movements, Political Parties and Democratic Theory.” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 528 (1): 1329.

Hans-Dieter Klingemann , Richard Hofferbert , and Ian Budge . 1994. Parties, Policies and Democracy: Theoretical Lenses on Public Policy. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Algis Krupavicius , and Irmina Matonyte . 2003. “Women in Lithuanian Politics: From Nomenklatura Selection to Representation.” In Women's Access to Political Power in Post-communist Europe, ed. Richard Matland and Kathleen Montgomery . New York: Oxford University Press, 81104.

Leah Levin . 1999. “Setting the Agenda: The Success of the 1977 Israel Women's Party.” Israel Studies 4 (2): 4063.

Arendt Lijphart . 1994. Electoral Systems and Party Systems: A Study of Twenty-Seven Democracies, 1945–1990. New York: Oxford University Press.

Richard Matland . 2003. “Women's Representation in Post-Communist Europe.” In Women's Access to Political Power in Post-Communist Europe, ed. Richard Matland and Kathleen Montgomery . New York: Oxford University Press, 321–42.

Doug McAdams , and Sydney Tarrow . 2010. “Ballots and Barricades: On the Reciprocal Relationship between Elections and Social Movements.” Perspectives on Politics 8 (2): 529–42.

Doug McAdam , Sidney Tarrow , and Charles Tilly . 2001. Dynamics of Contention. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

David Meyer , and Debra Minkoff . 2004. “Conceptualizing Political Opportunity.” Social Forces 82 (4): 1457–92.

Maxine Molyneux . 1994. “Women's Rights and the International Context: Some Reflections on the Post-Communist States.” Millennium 23 (2): 308309.

Linda Racioppi , and Katherine O'Sullivan See . 1995. “Organizing Women Before and After the Fall: Women's Politics in the Soviet Union and Post-Soviet Russia.” Signs 20 (4): 818–50.

Frances Rosenbluth , Rob Salmond , and Michael Thies . 2006. “Welfare Works: Explaining Female Legislative Representation.” Politics & Gender 2 (2): 165–92.

Rob Salmond . 2006. “Proportional Representation and Female Parliamentarians.” Legislative Studies Quarterly 31 (2): 175204.

Alan Siaroff . 2000. “Women's Representation in Legislatures and Cabinets in Industrial Democracies.” International Political Science Review 21 (2): 197215.

Margit Tavits . 2008. “Party Systems in the Making: The Emergence and Success of New Parties in New Democracies.” British Journal of Political Science 38 (1): 113–33.

Manon Tremblay . 2008. Women and Legislative Representation: Electoral Systems, Political Parties and Sex Quotas. London: MacMillan.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Politics & Gender
  • ISSN: 1743-923X
  • EISSN: 1743-9248
  • URL: /core/journals/politics-and-gender
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 35
Total number of PDF views: 218 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 296 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 20th August 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.