Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access
  • Cited by 1
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Logan, Alan C. Jacka, Felice N. Craig, Jeffrey M. and Prescott, Susan L. 2016. The Microbiome and Mental Health: Looking Back, Moving Forward with Lessons from Allergic Diseases. Clinical Psychopharmacology and Neuroscience, Vol. 14, Issue. 2, p. 131.

    ×

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        A double blind, placebo controlled, randomised pilot trial examining the effects of probiotic administration on mood and cognitive function
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        A double blind, placebo controlled, randomised pilot trial examining the effects of probiotic administration on mood and cognitive function
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        A double blind, placebo controlled, randomised pilot trial examining the effects of probiotic administration on mood and cognitive function
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

There is a growing body of evidence indicating that the gut microbiota communicates with the CNS influencing mood and behaviour( 1 7 ) and a role for the microbiota in the development of brain plasticity and the subsequent physiological response has been suggested( 2 ). Furthermore treatment with probiotics has been shown to alter functional task-related brain activity and changes in midbrain connectivity9. To date no study has demonstrated cognitive modification in response to probiotic treatment. The aims of the study were i) To examine the mood effects of probiotic supplementation at rest and in response to psychological stressors ii) To examine the effects of probiotic administration on cognitive functioning.

In this pilot study, healthy participants (n = 50) were recruited to take part in a double blind, randomised, controlled trial. Participants were randomized to receive either a probiotic preparation comprising two strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus CUL60 (NCIMB 30157) and CUL21 (NCIMB 30156), Bifidobacterium lactis CUL34 (NCIMB 30172) and Bifidobacterium bifidum CUL20 (NCIMB 30153) at a total of 2.5 × 1010 cfu/capsule or a placebo for 6 weeks. The sample population comprised 18 males and 32 females, mean age 23.22 years (range 19–38, sd 3.846), with a BMI <30. Participants underwent morphometric measurements (height, weight, % total body fat, hip and waist measurement) and completed mood, stress and depression questionnaires (Bond Lader Mood Scales, Stait Trait Anxiety Inventory and NASA Task Load Index). Participants also were required to perform a battery of computerised cognitive test (COMPASS) measuring attention, executive function, working memory and episodic memory.

In terms of mood measures, a significant interaction showed that ‘trait’ anxiety levels decreased in the active probiotic condition whilst increasing in the placebo condition over the course of the 6 week intervention (p = 0.042). A significant interaction was also observed for tasks of attention; ‘continuity of attention increased in response to the probiotic treatment and decreased with the placebo group (p = 0.035). No morphometric changes between the two treatment conditions were recorded during the intervention period. The findings of this pilot trial provide a justification for further studies to characterise the potential cognitive and mood enhancing benefits of probiotics in healthy populations.

This work was supported by Bioceticals, NSW Australia and Cultech Limited, S. Wales, UK.

1. Cryan, JF & Dinan, TG (2012) Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 13, 701712.
2. Sudo, N et al. (2004) The Journal of physiology 558, 263275.
3. O'Mahony, L et al. (2005) Gastroenterology. 128, 541551.
4. Gaykema, R et al. (2004) Brain. Behav. Immun. 18, 238245.
5. Goehler, LE et al. (2005) Brain. Behav. Immun. 19, 334344.
6. Goehler, LE et al. (2008) Brain. Behav. Immun. 22, 354366.
7. Lyte, M et al. (2006) Physiol. Behav. 89, 350357.