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Influences of probiotic bacteria on organic acid production by pig caecal bacteria in vitro

  • Takashi Sakata (a1), Taichi Kojima (a1), Masatoshi Fujieda (a1), Masanori Takahashi (a1) and Takashi Michibata (a1)...
Abstract

The mechanism of action of probiotics is largely unknown. A potential mechanism should be to increase the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), known modulators of gut functions, by the bacterial ecosystem in the large intestine. The present paper reviews our recent studies in which the capacity of probiotic bacteria to increase the production of SCFA by pig caecal bacteria was investigated using batch-culture and continuous-culture techniques. All four commercial probiotic preparations and three strains of probiotic bacteria dose-dependently accelerated the net production of SCFA, succinic acid and lactic acid without changing the acid profile, and slowed the net production of NH4. Effects on organic acid production did not vary among different probiotic species. Neither probiotic preparations nor probiotic bacteria affected the organic acid production from glucose, gastric mucin, starch or lactose, or organic acids produced:added saccharide. Glucose abolished these effects of probiotic preparations. However, the capacity of probiotics to increase SCFA production was not modified by gastric mucin, starch or lactose. These results indicate that probiotic bacteria increase SCFA production by accelerating the breakdown of carbohydrates that are resistant to indigenous bacteria, and suggest that the concept of prebiotics in terms of SCFA production as a measure of probiotic function is arguable.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Professor Takashi Sakata, fax +81 225 22 7746, sakata@isenshu-u.ac.jp
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Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
  • ISSN: 0029-6651
  • EISSN: 1475-2719
  • URL: /core/journals/proceedings-of-the-nutrition-society
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