Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Access
  • Cited by 10
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Beck, A. M. Dent, E. and Baldwin, C. 2016. Nutritional intervention as part of functional rehabilitation in older people with reduced functional ability: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled studies. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics,


    Hamirudin, Aliza Haslinda Charlton, Karen and Walton, Karen 2016. Outcomes related to nutrition screening in community living older adults: A systematic literature review. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Vol. 62, p. 9.


    Teixeira, Iane Ximenes Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira Martins, Larissa Castelo Guedes Diniz, Camila Maciel de Menezes, Angélica Paixão and Alves, Naiana Pacífico 2016. Validation of Clinical Indicators of Imbalanced Nutrition: Less Than Body Requirements in Early Childhood. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 31, Issue. 2, p. 179.


    Keller, H. H. Vesnaver, E. Davidson, B. Allard, J. Laporte, M. Bernier, P. Payette, H. Jeejeebhoy, K. Duerksen, D. and Gramlich, L. 2014. Providing quality nutrition care in acute care hospitals: perspectives of nutrition care personnel. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 27, Issue. 2, p. 192.


    Serra Majem, L. and Vázquez, C. 2014. Farreras-Rozman. Medicina Interna. Metabolismo y Nutrición. Endocrinología.


    Rasheed, Solah and Woods, Robert T. 2013. Predictive validity of ‘Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool’ (‘MUST’) and Short Form Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA-SF) in terms of survival and length of hospital stay. e-SPEN Journal, Vol. 8, Issue. 2, p. e44.


    Roberts, Helen C Pilgrim, Anna L Elia, Marinos Jackson, Alan A Cooper, Cyrus Sayer, Avan Aihie and Robinson, Sian M 2013. Southampton mealtime assistance study: design and methods. BMC Geriatrics, Vol. 13, Issue. 1,


    Elia, Marinos and Stratton, Rebecca J. 2011. Considerations for screening tool selection and role of predictive and concurrent validity. Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, Vol. 14, Issue. 5, p. 425.


    Kennelly, S. Kennedy, N. P. Corish, C. A. Flanagan-Rughoobur, G. Glennon-Slattery, C. and Sugrue, S. 2011. Sustained benefits of a community dietetics intervention designed to improve oral nutritional supplement prescribing practices. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 24, Issue. 5, p. 496.


    Charlton, Karen 2010. Nutrition screening: Time to address the skeletons in the bedroom closet as well as those in hospitals. Nutrition & Dietetics, Vol. 67, Issue. 4, p. 209.


    ×
  • Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, Volume 69, Issue 4
  • November 2010, pp. 470-476

Malnutrition in the UK: policies to address the problem

  • M. Elia (a1), C. A. Russell (a2) and R. J. Stratton (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0029665110001746
  • Published online: 16 June 2010
Abstract

In 2007, the estimated cost of disease-related malnutrition in the UK was in excess of £13×109. At any point in time, only about 2% of over 3 million individuals at risk of malnutrition were in hospital, 5% in care homes and the remainder in the community (2–3% in sheltered housing). Some government statistics (England) grossly underestimated the prevalence of malnutrition on admission and discharge from hospital (1000–3000 annually between 1998 and 2008), which is less than 1% of the prevalence (about 3 million in 2007–2008) established by national surveys using criteria based on the ‘Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool’ (‘MUST’). The incidence of malnutrition-related deaths in hospitals, according to government statistics (242 deaths in England in 2007), was also <1% of an independent estimate, which was as high as 100 000/year. Recent healthcare policies have reduced the number of hospital and care home beds and encouraged care closer to home. Such policies have raised issues about education and training of the homecare workforce, including 6 million insufficiently supported informal carers (10% of the population), the commissioning process, and difficulties in implementing nutritional policies in a widely distributed population. The four devolved nations in the UK (England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales) have developed their own healthcare polices to deal with malnutrition. These generally aim to span across all care settings and various government departments in a co-ordinated manner, but their effectiveness remains to be properly evaluated.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Malnutrition in the UK: policies to address the problem
      Your Kindle email address
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Malnutrition in the UK: policies to address the problem
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Malnutrition in the UK: policies to address the problem
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Professor M. Elia, fax +44 2380 79 4945, email elia@soton.ac.uk
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

7.CA Russell & M Elia (2010) Malnutrition in the UK: where does it begin? Proc Nutr Soc (In the Press).

10.AL Rust , AL Cawood , RJ Stratton (2010) Prevalence of malnutrition in hospital outpatients. Proc Nutr Soc OC10 (In the Press).

11.AL Cawood , S Rust , RJ Stratton . (2010) The impact of malnutrition on health care use in hospital outpatients. Proc Nutr Soc (In the Press).

12.P Collins , RJ Stratton , R Kurukulaaratchy . (2010) Prevalence of malnutrition in outpatients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Proc Nutr Soc OC7 (In the press).

28.M Lean & M Wiseman (2008) Malnutrition in hospitals. BMJ 336, 290.

35.T Dixon , M Shaw , S Frankel (2004) Hospital admissions, age, and death: retrospective cohort study. BMJ 328, 1288.

39.N Hawkes (2009) The mysterious Dr Foster. BMJ 339, 13361337.

43.RJ Stratton & M Elia (2010) Encouraging appropriate, evidence-based use of oral nutrition supplements. Proc Nutr Soc (In the Press).

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
  • ISSN: 0029-6651
  • EISSN: 1475-2719
  • URL: /core/journals/proceedings-of-the-nutrition-society
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: