Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        No effect of vitamin D supplementation on serum fibrinogen concentrations in adults aged ≥64 years
        Available formats
        ×
        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        No effect of vitamin D supplementation on serum fibrinogen concentrations in adults aged ≥64 years
        Available formats
        ×
        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        No effect of vitamin D supplementation on serum fibrinogen concentrations in adults aged ≥64 years
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

High serum concentration of the acute phase protein fibrinogen is associated with tissue inflammation and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Low vitamin D status is associated with an increased risk of CVD and the active form of the vitamin, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, is a potent immunomodulator. Furthermore, vitamin D supplementation has been shown to reduce serum concentrations of inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein in vitamin D deficient individuals. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of vitamin D supplementation on serum fibrinogen concentrations in a group of apparently healthy adults aged ≥64 years recruited in Cork and Coleraine.

A total of 202 individuals (males, n=81; females, n=121) were randomly assigned to receive either 5, 10 or 15 μg vitamin D3/d or placebo for 22 weeks. Serum vitamin D status (25-hydroyvitamin D (25(OH)D)) and fibrinogen concentrations were measured at baseline and post intervention using commercially available ELISA kits.

Vitamin D status did not significantly correlate with serum fibrinogen concentrations at baseline or post intervention. One-way analysis of covariance (adjusted for age, sex, centre, body mass index and baseline concentrations) revealed that while vitamin D supplementation significantly increased vitamin D status, it did not alter fibrinogen concentrations.

25(OH)D, 25-hydroxyvitamin D.

* Values are median (IQR).

† Effect of treatment assessed on log transformed data by ANCOVA. Different superscript letters denote significant differences between treatment groups (ANOVA).

In conclusion, vitamin D supplementation had a significant dose-response effect on vitamin D status, but did not affect serum concentrations of the inflammatory marker fibrinogen in healthy older adults. These findings concur with previous research in vitamin D deficient adults. However, it has been suggested that 25(OH)D concentrations >100 nmol/l may be required for modulation of immune responses; concentrations higher than those observed in the current study, even after vitamin D supplementation.

This work was supported by the UK Food Standards Agency.