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Nutritional influences on bone mass

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2007

David M. Reid
Affiliation:
Osteoporosis Research Unit, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD
Susan A. New
Affiliation:
Centre for Nutrition and Food Safety, School of Biological Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 5XH
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Abstract

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Type
Symposium on ‘Nutritional aspects of bone’
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1997

References

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