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Bulls, Goats, and Pedagogy: Engaging Students in Overseas Development Aid

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 January 2009

William F. S. Miles
Affiliation:
Northeastern University

Abstract

This article illustrates the profound learning that occurs—for students and instructor alike—when a class on third-world development attempts to undertake foreign aid. With undergraduate, graduate, and departmental money, I purchased bulls and carts for farmers, and goats for widows, in two West African villages. Such experiential learning personalized for students the study of micropolitics under conditions of poverty, the development of organizational structure, and north-south dependency.

Type
The Teacher
Copyright
Copyright © The American Political Science Association 2009

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References

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