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Forecasting the Presidential Vote with Leading Economic Indicators and the Polls

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 October 2016

Robert S. Erikson
Affiliation:
Columbia University
Christopher Wlezien
Affiliation:
University of Texas at Austin

Abstract

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Type
Symposium: Forecasting the 2016 American National Elections
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2016 

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References

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