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Misconceptions and Realities of the 2011 Tunisian Election

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 September 2013

Moez Hababou
Affiliation:
United Bank of Switzerland, New York
Nawel Amrouche
Affiliation:
Long Island University, New York

Abstract

In response to the 2011 Tunisian elections and the uncertainty surrounding Tunisia's future, we offer an empirical explanation of the election's results using socioeconomic and demographic variables. We aggregate many political analyses to describe the main parties and give insights into their strengths and weaknesses. We also examine common misconceptions advanced during the elections. Finally, we include a proposed electoral map that could be used by politicians to plan their future political strategies.

Type
Features
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2013 

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References

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