Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7ccbd9845f-9nx8b Total loading time: 0.711 Render date: 2023-01-29T08:50:32.980Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Teaching Race and Revolution: Doing Justice to Women’s Roles in the Struggle for Civil Rights

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 July 2016

Rosalyn Cooperman
Affiliation:
University of Mary Washington
Melina Patterson
Affiliation:
University of Mary Washington
Jess Rigelhaupt
Affiliation:
University of Mary Washington

Abstract

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
The Teacher Symposium: Mainstreaming Gender in the Teaching and Learning of Politics
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2016 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

Allen, Marcus D. and Wallace, Sherri L.. 2010. “Teaching Introduction to American Government Politics: What We Learn from Visual Images in Textbooks.” Journal of Political Science Education 6 (1): 118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Apple, Michael W. and Christian-Smith, Linda K.. 1991. The Politics of the Textbook. New York: Routledge Press.Google Scholar
Barnett, Bernice McNair. 1993. “Invisible Southern Black Women Leaders in the Civil Rights Movement: The Triple Constraints of Gender, Race, and Class.” Gender & Society 7 (2): 162–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cassese, Erin, Bos, Angie, and Schneider, Monica. 2014. “Whose American Government? A Quantitative Analysis of Gender and Authorship in American Politics Texts.” Journal of Political Science Education 10: 253–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cole, Johnnetta B. and Guy-Sheftall, Beverly. 2003. Gender Talk: The Struggle for Women’s Equality in African American Communities. New York: Ballantine Books.Google Scholar
Collier-Thomas, Bettye and Franklin, Vincent P.. 2001. Sisters in the Struggle: African American Women in the Civil Rights-Black Power Movement. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
Crawford, Vicki L., Rouse, Jacqueline Anne, and Woods, Barbara. 1990. Women in the Civil Rights Movement: Trailblazers and Torchbearers, 1941-1965. Vol. 16. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
Crenshaw, Kimberlé. 1989. “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory, and Antiracist Politics,” University of Chicago Legal Forum 140: 139–67.Google Scholar
Gore, Dayo F., Theoharis, Jeanne, and Woodard, Komozi, eds. 2009. Want to Start a Revolution?: Radical Women in the Black Freedom Struggle. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
McGuire, Danielle L. 2011. At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance - A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power. New York: Vintage Books.Google Scholar
Olivo, Christiane. 2012. “Bringing Women In: Gender and American Government and Politics Textbooks.” Journal of Political Science Education 8 (2): 131–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Olson, Lynne. 2001. Freedom’s Daughters: The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement From 1830 to 1970. New York: Simon and Schuster.Google Scholar
Stroup, Daniel G. and Garriott, William. 1997. “Teaching American Government: An Alternative to Ogg and Ray.” PS: Political Science & Politics 30 (1): 7377.Google Scholar
Theoharis, Jeanne. 2013. The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks. New York: Beacon Press.Google Scholar
Wallace, Sherri L. and Allen, Marcus D.. 2008. “Survey of African American Portrayal in Introductory Textbooks in American Government Politics: A Report of the APSA Standing Committee on the Status of Blacks in the Profession.” PS: Political Science & Politics 41 (1): 153160.Google Scholar
Supplementary material: File

Cooperman supplementary material

Cooperman supplementary material 1

Download Cooperman supplementary material(File)
File 146 KB

A correction has been issued for this article:

1
Cited by

Linked content

Please note a has been issued for this article.

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Teaching Race and Revolution: Doing Justice to Women’s Roles in the Struggle for Civil Rights
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Teaching Race and Revolution: Doing Justice to Women’s Roles in the Struggle for Civil Rights
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Teaching Race and Revolution: Doing Justice to Women’s Roles in the Struggle for Civil Rights
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *