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Tradition! Tradition? Jewish Voting in the 2012 Election

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 June 2014

Herbert F. Weisberg*
Affiliation:
The Ohio State University

Abstract

The voting of Jews in the 2012 US presidential election is discussed in this article within the context of a recent reexamination of historical data on Jewish voting. Two Election-Night polls of Jews and the largest scientific survey of Jews to date make this detailed exploration of Jewish voting possible. Voting differences among Jews are analyzed, especially among major denominational movements. The role of American policy on the Middle East merits specific attention, particularly given concern about the potential Iranian nuclear threat to Israel. Explanations of Jewish liberalness and Democratic identification are considered, with a special focus on the role of social identity. A reluctance of Jewish conservatives to identify as Republicans is discussed as well as how Jewish conservatives react to economic and social issues. The possibility of a party realignment of Jews along generational and denominational lines is considered, as well as the impact of the Republican alliance with Evangelical Christians and the Tea Party.

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Features
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2014 

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References

REFERENCES

Forman, Ira N. 2004. “The Politics of Minority Consciousness: The Historical Voting Behavior of American Jews.” In Jews in American Politics, ed. Sandy Maisel, L. and Forman, Ira N., 141–60. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.Google Scholar
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Solomon Project. 2012. See Mellman, Strauss, and Wald 2012.
Uslaner, Eric M., and Lichbach, Mark. 2009. “Identity versus Identity: Israel and Evangelicals and the Two-Front War for Jewish Votes.” Politics and Religion 2: 395419.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Weisberg, Herbert F. 2011. “The Distinctiveness of the Jewish-American Voter.” Paper presented at the Frankel Institute for Advanced Judaic Studies Symposium on Jewish Political Behavior, November 10–11, Ann Arbor, MI.
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