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Comic-Con: Can Comics of the Constitution Enable Meaningful Learning in Political Science?

  • Katharine A. Owens (a1), Victor Eno (a2), Jocelyn Abrams (a1) and Danielle Bedney (a1)

Abstract

This article explores the value and application of using comic images to teach difficult political texts. We presented either visual or textual portions of the Constitution to 71 American 18- to 22-year-olds using Survey Monkey Audience, measuring and comparing their knowledge of the Constitution before and after viewing. Respondents viewing the comic of congressional duties experienced statistically significant gains in pretest to posttest mean knowledge scores. Respondents viewing the text also experienced an increase in mean scores pretest to posttest; however, these changes were smaller and not statistically significant. This indicates that students may better comprehend content from visual depictions of difficult texts. We conclude by providing an example of one way that we use comics of political texts as a tool for student learning in an international civics exchange program.

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References

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Type Description Title
PDF
Supplementary materials

Owens et al. supplementary material
Appendix B

 PDF (37 KB)
37 KB
PDF
Supplementary materials

Owens et al. supplementary material
Appendix A

 PDF (47 KB)
47 KB
PDF
Supplementary materials

Owens et al. supplementary material
Appendix C

 PDF (1.1 MB)
1.1 MB
PDF
Supplementary materials

Owens et al. supplementary material
Appendix D

 PDF (92 KB)
92 KB

Comic-Con: Can Comics of the Constitution Enable Meaningful Learning in Political Science?

  • Katharine A. Owens (a1), Victor Eno (a2), Jocelyn Abrams (a1) and Danielle Bedney (a1)

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