Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Gender Gaps in Perceptions of Political Science Journals

  • Nadia E. Brown (a1), Yusaku Horiuchi (a2), Mala Htun (a3) and David Samuels (a4)

Abstract

The gender publication gap puts women at a disadvantage for tenure and promotion, which contributes to the discipline’s leaky pipeline. Several studies published in PS find no evidence of gender bias in the review process and instead suggest that submission pools are distorted by gender. To make a contribution to this important debate, we fielded an original survey to a sample of American Political Science Association members to measure participants’ perceptions of political science journals. Results reveal that the gender submission gap is accompanied by a gender perception gap at some but not all political science journals we study. Women report that they are more likely to submit to and get published in some journals, whereas men report as such with regard to other journals. Importantly, these gaps are observed even among scholars with the same methodological (i.e., quantitative or qualitative) approach.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Gender Gaps in Perceptions of Political Science Journals
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Gender Gaps in Perceptions of Political Science Journals
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Gender Gaps in Perceptions of Political Science Journals
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
Box-Steffensmeier, Janet M., Cunha, Raphael C., Varbanov, Roumen A., Hoh, Yee Shwen, Knisley, Margaret L., and Holmes, Mary Alice. 2015. “Survival Analysis of Faculty Retention and Promotion in the Social Sciences by Gender.” PloS One 10 (11): e0143093.
Breuning, Marijke, Gross, Benjamin Isaak, Feinberg, Ayal, Martinez, Melissa, Sharma, Ramesh, and Ishiyama, John. 2018. “Clearing the Pipeline? Gender and the Review Process at the American Political Science Review.” PS: Political Science & Politics 51 (3): 629–34.
Breuning, Marijke, and Sanders, Kathryn. 2007. “Gender and Journal Authorship in Eight Prestigious Political Science Journals.” PS: Political Science & Politics 40 (2): 347–51.
Colgan, Jeff. 2017. “Gender Bias in International Relations Graduate Education? New Evidence from Syllabi.” PS: Political Science & Politics 50 (2): 456–60.
Dion, Michelle L., Sumner, Jane Lawrence, and Mitchell, Sara McLaughlin. 2018. “Gendered Citation Patterns across Political Science and Social Science Methodology Fields.” Political Analysis 26 (3): 312–27.
Djupe, Paul A., Smith, Amy Erica, and Sokhey, Anand Edward. 2019. “Explaining Gender in the Journals: How Submission Practices Affect Publication Patterns in Political Science.” PS: Political Science & Politics 52 (1): 7177.
Evans, Heather K., and Moulder, Ashley. 2011. “Reflecting on a Decade of Women’s Publications in Four Top Political Science Journals.” PS: Political Science & Politics 44 (4): 793–98.
Heckman, James J., and Moktan, Sidharth. 2018. “Publishing and Promotion in Economics: The Tyranny of the Top Five.” NBER Working Paper No. 25093, September.
Jensenius, Francesca R., Htun, Mala, Samuels, David J., Singer, David A., Lawrence, Adria, and Chwe, Michael. 2018. “The Benefits and Pitfalls of Google Scholar.” PS: Political Science & Politics 51 (4): 820–24.
König, Thomas, and Ropers, Guido. 2018. “Gender and Editorial Outcomes at the American Political Science Review.” PS: Political Science & Politics 51 (4): 849–53.
Lawless, Jennifer L., and Fox, Richard L.. 2005. It Takes a Candidate: Why Women Don’t Run for Office. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Maliniak, Daniel, Powers, Ryan, and Walter, Barbara F.. 2013. “The Gender Citation Gap in International Relations.” International Organization 67 (4): 889922.
Nedal, Dani K., and Nexon, Daniel H.. 2018. “Gender in the International Studies Quarterly Review Process.” PS: Political Science & Politics 51 (4): 859–65.
Peterson, David A. M. 2018. “Author Gender and Editorial Outcomes at Political Behavior.” PS: Political Science & Politics 51 (4): 866–69.
Samuels, David. 2018. “Gender and Editorial Outcomes at Comparative Political Studies.” PS: Political Science & Politics 51 (4): 854–58.
Teele, Dawn Langan, and Thelen, Kathleen. 2017. “Gender in the Journals: Publication Patterns in Political Science.” PS: Political Science & Politics 50 (2): 433–47.
Topaz, Chad M., and Sen, Shilad. 2016. “Gender Representation on Journal Editorial Boards in the Mathematical Sciences.” PLoS One 11 (8): e0161357.
Tudor, Carissa L., and Yashar, Deborah J.. 2018. “Gender and the Editorial Process: World Politics, 2007–2017.” PS: Political Science & Politics 51 (4): 870–80.
Type Description Title
PDF
Supplementary materials

Brown et al. supplementary material
Brown et al. supplementary material

 PDF (436 KB)
436 KB

Gender Gaps in Perceptions of Political Science Journals

  • Nadia E. Brown (a1), Yusaku Horiuchi (a2), Mala Htun (a3) and David Samuels (a4)

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed