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Partisan Affiliation in Political Science: Insights from Florida and North Carolina

  • Lonna Rae Atkeson (a1) and Andrew J. Taylor (a2)
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References

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Lederman, Doug. 2018. “Leading in Turbulent Times: A Survey of Presidents.” Inside Higher Ed. Available at www.insidehighered.com/news/survey/survey-college-presidents-finds-worry-about-public-attitudes-confidence-finances.
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Turnage, Clara. 2017. “Most Republicans Think Colleges Are Bad for the Country. Why?Chronicle of Higher Education, July 10. Available at www.chronicle.com/article/Most-Republicans-Think/240587.
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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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