Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Breakfast habits affect overall nutrient profiles in adolescents

  • C Matthys (a1), S De Henauw (a1) (a2), M Bellemans (a1), M De Maeyer (a1) and G De Backer (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

To describe breakfast consumption patterns, on a nutrient and food item level, in Belgian adolescents.

Design

A 7-day estimated food record was administered in a cross-sectional survey.

Setting

Secondary schools in Ghent, Belgium.

Subjects

A total of 341 adolescents (13–18 years old), multistage clustered sampling.

Results

The energy contribution of breakfast to daily energy intake was on average 15.7% in boys and 14.9% in girls. Significantly more overweight girls and significantly more girls following vocational training were categorised as eating a low-quality breakfast. In boys, the energy contribution of polysaccharides was significantly higher in consumers of good-quality breakfasts. The intake of all selected micronutrients was significantly higher in consumers of good-quality breakfasts. In girls, the total energy intake and the proportional intake of proteins and polysaccharides were significantly higher in consumers of good-quality breakfasts, while the proportional contribution of total fat, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids was significantly lower in these girls. The intake of all micronutrients was significantly higher in girls consuming a good-quality breakfast. In all adolescents, consumers of a good-quality breakfast had significantly higher intakes of bread, fruit, vegetables, milk and milk products, and fruit juice, while intake of soft drinks was significantly lower than in consumers of low-quality breakfasts.

Conclusions

Consumers of a good-quality breakfast had a better overall dietary pattern – on a nutrient and food group level – than consumers of a low-quality breakfast. A daily breakfast, including whole-grain products, fruit and (semi-) skimmed milk products or an alternative source of calcium, is recommended.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Breakfast habits affect overall nutrient profiles in adolescents
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Breakfast habits affect overall nutrient profiles in adolescents
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Breakfast habits affect overall nutrient profiles in adolescents
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email Christophe.Matthys@UGent.be

References

Hide All
1Keski-Rahkonen, A, Kaprio, J, Rissanen, A, Virkkunen, M, Rose, RJ. Breakfast skipping and health-compromising behaviors in adolescents and adults. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2003; 57: 842–53.
2Ruxton, CH, Kirk, TR. Breakfast: a review of associations with measures of dietary intake, physiology and biochemistry. British Journal of Nutrition 1997; 78: 199213.
3Rampersaud, GC, Pereira, MA, Girard, BL, Adams, J, Metzl, JD. Breakfast habits, nutritional status, body weight, and academic performance in children and adolescents. Journal of American Dietetic Association 2005; 105: 743–60.
4Pollitt, E. Does breakfast make a difference in school? Journal of the American Dietetic Association 1995; 95: 1134–9.
5Pollitt, E, Mathews, R. Breakfast and cognition: an integrative summary. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1998; 67: 804S–13S.
6Rogers, PJ. How important is breakfast? British Journal of Nutrition 1997; 78: 197–8.
7Aranceta, J, Serra-Majem, L, Ribas, L, Perez-Rodrigo, C. Breakfast consumption in Spanish children and young people. Public Health Nutrition 2001; 4: 1439–44.
8Affenito, SG, Thompson, DR, Barton, BA, Franko, DL, Daniels, SR, Obarzanek, E, et al. . Breakfast consumption by African-American and white adolescent girls correlates positively with calcium and fiber intake and negatively with body mass index. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2005; 105: 938–45.
9Morgan, KJ, Zabik, ME, Stampley, GL. The role of breakfast in diet adequacy of the U.S. adult population. Journal of American College of Nutrition 1986; 5: 551–63.
10Navia, B, Requejo, AM, Ortega, RM, Lopez Sobaler, AM, Quintas, ME, Andres, P, et al. . The relationship between breakfast and whole diet energy profiles in a group of preschool children. Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism 1997; 41: 299306.
11Sjoberg, A, Hallberg, L, Hoglund, D, Hulthen, L. Meal pattern, food choice, nutrient intake and lifestyle factors in The Goteborg Adolescence Study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2003; 57: 1569–78.
12Matthys, C, De Henauw, S, Devos, C, De Backer, G. Estimated energy intake, macronutrient intake and meal pattern of Flemish adolescents. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2003; 57: 366–75.
13NEVO. NEVO Tabel, Nederlands Voedingsstoffenbestand. Zeist: NEVO, 1993.
14NUBEL. Belgische Voedingsmiddelentabel. Brussels: Ministerie van Volksgezondheid, 1992.
15NUBEL. Belgische Voedinsmiddelentabel, Tweede Uitgave. Brussels: Ministerie van Volksgezondheid, 1995.
16Unilever. Becel Voedingsprogramma. Rotterdam: Nederlandse Unilever Bedrijven BV, 1992.
17Goldberg, GR, Black, AE, Jebb, SA, Cole, TJ, Murgatroyd, PR, Coward, WA, et al. . Critical evaluation of energy intake data using fundamental principles of energy physiology: 1. Derivation of cut-off limits to identify under-recording. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1991; 45: 569–81.
18Cole, TJ, Bellizzi, MC, Flegal, KM, Dietz, WH. Establishing a standard definition for child overweight and obesity worldwide: international survey. British Medical Journal 2000; 320: 1240–3.
19Cereal Institute Inc. A Complete Summary of the Iowa Breakfast Studies. Chicago, IL: Cereal Institute Inc., 1962.
20Preziosi, P, Galan, P, Deheeger, M, Yacoub, N, Drewnowski, A, Hercberg, S. Breakfast type, daily nutrient intakes and vitamin and mineral status of French children, adolescents, and adults. Journal of American College of Nutrition 1999; 18: 171–8.
21Pérez-Rodrigo, C, Ribas Barba, L, Serra Majem, L, Aranceta Bartina, J. Recomendaciones para un desayuno saludable. In: Serra Majem, L, Aranceta Bartina, J, eds. Desayno y Equilibro Alimentario. Barcelona: Masson, 2000; 91–7.
22Vlaams Instituut voor Gezondheidspromotie. De Voedingsdriehoek: Een Praktische Voedingsgids [The Food Triangle: A Practical Guide]. Brussels: Vlaams Instituut voor Gezondheidspromotie, 2003.
23Morgan, KJ, Zabik, ME, Leveille, GA. The role of breakfast in nutrient intake of 5- to 12-year-old children. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1981; 34: 1418–27.
24Hercberg, S, Preziosi, P, Galan, P, Yacoub, N, Kara, G, Deheeger, M. La consumation du petit-déjeuner dans l'étude du Val-De-Marne. 3. La valeur nutritionelle du petit-déjeuner et ses relations avec l'équilibre nutritionnel global et le statut minéral et vitaminique. Cahier Nutritionelle et Diététique 1996; 31(Suppl. 1): 1824.
25Baric, IC, Satalic, Z. Breakfast quality differences among children and adolescents in Croatia. International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition 2002; 53: 7987.
26Ortega, RM, Requejo, AM, Lopez-Sobaler, AM, Andres, P, Quintas, ME, Navia, B, et al. . The importance of breakfast in meeting daily recommended calcium intake in a group of schoolchildren. Journal of American College of Nutrition 1998; 17: 1924.
27De Graaf, C, Hulshof, T, Weststrate, JA, Jas, P. Short-term effects of different amounts of protein, fats, and carbohydrates on satiety. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1992; 55: 33–8.
28Lattimore, PJ, Halford, JC. Adolescence and the diet–dieting disparity: healthy food choice or risky health behaviour? British Journal of Health Psychology 2003; 8: 451–63.
29Vereecken, CA, Bobelijn, K, Maes, L. School food policy at primary and secondary schools in Belgium-Flanders: does it influence young people's food habits? European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2005; 59: 271–7.
30Schlundt, DG, Hill, JO, Sbrocco, T, Pope-Cordle, J, Sharp, T. The role of breakfast in the treatment of obesity: a randomized clinical trial. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1992; 55: 645–51.
31Elfhag, K, Rossner, S. Who succeeds in maintaining weight loss? A conceptual review of factors associated with weight loss maintenance and weight regain. Obesity Reviews 2005; 6: 6785.
32Louis-Sylvestre, J, Lluch, A, Neant, F, Blundell, JE. Highlighting the positive impact of increasing feeding frequency on metabolism and weight management. Forum Nutrition 2003; 56: 126–8.
33Mattson, MP. The need for controlled studies of the effects of meal frequency on health. Lancet 2005; 365: 1978–80.
34Gibney, MJ, Wolever, TM. Periodicity of eating and human health: present perspective and future directions. British Journal of Nutrition 1997; 77(Suppl 1): S35.
35Gibson, S. Micronutrient intakes, micronutrient status and lipid profiles among young people consuming different amounts of breakfast cereals: further analysis of data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey of Young People aged 4 to 18 years. Public Health Nutrition 2003; 6: 815–20.
36Galvin, MA, Kiely, M, Flynn, A. Impact of ready-to-eat breakfast cereal (RTEBC) consumption on adequacy of micronutrient intakes and compliance with dietary recommendations in Irish adults. Public Health Nutrition 2003; 6: 351–63.
37Gassin, AL. Helping to promote healthy diets and lifestyles: the role of the food industry. Public Health Nutrition 2001; 4: 1445–50.
38Belderson, P, Harvey, I, Kimbell, R, O'Neill, J, Russell, J, Barker, ME. Does breakfast-club attendance affect schoolchildren's nutrient intake? A study of dietary intake at three schools. British Journal of Nutrition 2003; 90: 1003–6.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed