Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Do national research priorities align with burden of disease?
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Do national research priorities align with burden of disease?
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Do national research priorities align with burden of disease?
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Research has its greatest utility when it can be applied to address individual, societal, population and ecological problems. If you agree with this statement, then it is not unreasonable to assume that you would agree with Llanos et al.’s(1) proposition in this issue that the alignment of research priorities with the corresponding population burden of disease is desirable, to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of actions required to improve health. This paper contrasts the epidemiological profile of nine Latin American countries with the research priorities in academic institutions in each country and finds a misalignment between public health nutrition needs and research priorities. Their finding that studies on the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions were uncommon reinforces the ongoing challenge for public health nutrition researchers and practitioners to prioritise and provide this evidence through intervention research.

Haerens et al.(2) have responded to this challenge in their paper explaining the effect of a 1-year intervention promoting physical activity in middle schools, using mediation analysis.

Food diversity and neophobia affects dietary quality

Diversity in food consumption is widely recognised as an important predictor of dietary quality, particularly among indigenous peoples. In this issue, Roche et al.(3) assess the utility of a food diversity score for predicting nutrient adequacy among the Awajún culture of the Peruvian Amazon. At the other end of the diversity spectrum, Schickenberg et al.(4) explore the effect of food neophobia on acquaintance with and willingness to try healthful foods among Dutch consumers. It appears that lower educational attainment and opportunity is associated with greater neophobia in the context of healthful foods.

Yet another argument for breast-feeding promotion

Noor and Rousham(5) present results from a cross-sectional household survey of infant feeding and maternal well-being among women in north-east England of Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnicity. Their data suggest an important mediating role of breast-feeding in maternal mental health after childbirth, providing yet another good reason for promoting breastfeeding as the norm and proactively supporting this feeding choice among mothers.

References

1. Llanos, A, Oyarsun, MT, Bonvecchio, A, Rivera, J & Uauy, R (2002) Are research priorities in Latin America in line with nutritional problems of the population? Public Health Nutr 11, 466477.
2. Haerens, L, Cerin, E, Maes, L, Cardon, G, Deforche, B & De Bourdeaudhuij, I (2008) Explaining the effect of a 1-year intervention promoting physical activity in middle schools: a mediation analysis. Public Health Nutr 11, 501512.
3. Roche, ML, Creed-Kanashiro, HM, Tuesta, I & Kuhnlein, HV (2008) Traditional food diversity predicts dietary quality for the Awajún in the Peruvian Amazon. Public Health Nutr 11, 457465.
4. Schickenberg, B, van Assema, P, Brug, J & de Vries, NK (2008) Are the Dutch acquainted with and willing to try healthful food products? The role of food neophobia. Public Health Nutr 11, 493500.
5. Noor, SZ & Rousham, EK (2008) Breast-feeding and maternal well-being among Bangladeshi and Pakistani women in north-east England. Public Health Nutr 11, 486492.