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    Myhre, Jannicke B Løken, Elin B Wandel, Margareta and Andersen, Lene F 2015. Meal types as sources for intakes of fruits, vegetables, fish and whole grains among Norwegian adults. Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 18, Issue. 11, p. 2011.


    Myhre, Jannicke B Løken, Elin B Wandel, Margareta and Andersen, Lene F 2015. The contribution of snacks to dietary intake and their association with eating location among Norwegian adults – results from a cross-sectional dietary survey. BMC Public Health, Vol. 15, Issue. 1,


    Naska, Androniki Katsoulis, Michail Orfanos, Philippos Lachat, Carl Gedrich, Kurt Rodrigues, Sara S. P. Freisling, Heinz Kolsteren, Patrick Engeset, Dagrun Lopes, Carla Elmadfa, Ibrahim Wendt, Andrea Knüppel, Sven Turrini, Aida Tumino, Rosario Ocké, Marga C. Sekula, Wlodzimierz Nilsson, Lena Maria Key, Tim and Trichopoulou, Antonia 2015. Eating out is different from eating at home among individuals who occasionally eat out. A cross-sectional study among middle-aged adults from eleven European countries. British Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 113, Issue. 12, p. 1951.


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Eating location is associated with the nutritional quality of the diet in Norwegian adults

  • Jannicke B Myhre (a1), Elin B Løken (a1), Margareta Wandel (a1) and Lene F Andersen (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980013000268
  • Published online: 12 March 2013
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To study the association between dinner eating location and the nutritional quality of the specific dinner meal and the whole-day dietary intake and to compare the diets of those consuming ≥25 % of energy out of home and at school/work (SOH; substantial out-of-home eaters) with those consuming <25 % of energy out (NSOH; non-substantial out-of-home eaters).

Design

Cross-sectional dietary survey using two non-consecutive 24 h recalls. Recorded eating locations were at home, other private households, work/school, restaurant/cafeteria/fast-food outlet and travel/meeting.

Setting

Nationwide, Norway (2010–2011).

Subjects

Adults aged 18–70 years (n 1746).

Results

Dinners at restaurants and other private households were higher in energy than home dinners (P < 0·01). Restaurant dinners contained less fibre (g/MJ; P < 0·01) and had a higher percentage of alcohol consumers (P < 0·05), while dinners at other private households had a higher percentage of energy from sugar (P < 0·001) and a higher percentage of consumers of sugar-sweetened beverages (P < 0·05) than home dinners. Most differences between dinners consumed at different eating locations were also observed in dietary intakes for the whole day. SOH-eaters had a higher energy intake (P < 0·01), a higher percentage of energy from sugar (P < 0·01) and a lower fibre intake (P < 0·01) than NSOH-eaters. The percentages of consumers of alcohol and sugar-sweetened beverages were higher (P < 0·01) among SOH-eaters.

Conclusions

Dinner eating location was significantly associated with the nutritional quality of the diet, both for the specific dinner meal and for whole-day intake. Our data generally point to healthier dinners being consumed at home. SOH-eaters had a less favourable dietary intake than NSOH-eaters.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email j.b.myhre@medisin.uio.no
Linked references
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