Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Epidemiological and nutritional transition in Mexico: rapid increase of non-communicable chronic diseases and obesity

  • Juan A Rivera (a1), Simón Barquera (a1), Fabricio Campirano (a1), Ismael Campos (a1), Margarita Safdie (a1) and Víctor Tovar (a2)...
Abstract
Objective:

The objective of this paper is to characterise the epidemiological and nutritional transition and their determinants in Mexico.

Design:

Age-adjusted standardised mortality rates (SMRs) due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), diabetes mellitus and hypertension were calculated for 1980–1998. Changes in the prevalences of overweight and obesity in women and children and of dietary intake from 1988 to 1999 were also used in the analysis. Quantities of food groups purchased by adult equivalent (AE) and food expenditures away from home between 1984 and 1989 were used to assess trends. All information was analysed at the national and regional levels, and by urban and rural areas.

Results:

SMR for diabetes, AMI and hypertension increased dramatically parallel to obesity at the national and regional levels. Fat intake in women and the purchase of refined carbohydrates, including soda, also increased.

Discussion:

The results suggest that obesity is playing a role in the increased SMRs of diabetes, AMI and hypertension in Mexico. Total energy dietary intake and food purchase data could not explain the rise in the prevalence of obesity. The increases in fat intake and the purchase of refined carbohydrates may be risk factors for increased mortality. Information on physical activity was not available.

Conclusion:

SMRs due to diabetes, hypertension and AMI have increased dramatically in parallel with the prevalence of obesity; therefore actions should be taken for the prevention of obesity. Reliable information about food consumption and physical activity is required to assess their specific roles in the aetiology of obesity.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Epidemiological and nutritional transition in Mexico: rapid increase of non-communicable chronic diseases and obesity
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Epidemiological and nutritional transition in Mexico: rapid increase of non-communicable chronic diseases and obesity
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Epidemiological and nutritional transition in Mexico: rapid increase of non-communicable chronic diseases and obesity
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email sbarquera@insp.mx
References
Hide All
1Ch´vez, A, De Ch´vez, M, Rold´n, A, Bermejo, S, Avila, A, Madrigal, H. The Food and Nutrition Situation in Mexico: A Food Consumption, Nutritional Status and Applied Programs Tendencies Report from 1960 to 1990, 1st ed. Mexico City: Editorial Pax, Mexico, 1996.
2Hernandez-Diaz, S, Peterson, K, Dixit, S, Hernandez-Prado, B, Parra, S, Barquera, S, Sepúlveda, J, Rivera, J. Association of maternal short stature with stunting in Mexican children: common genes vs common environment. Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 1999; 53: 938–45.
3Frenk, J, Frejka, T, Bobadilla, JL, Stern, C, Lozano, M, Sepúlveda, J, et al. The epidemiologic transition in Latin America [in Spanish]. Boletin de la Oficina Sanitaria Panamericana 1991; 111(6): 485–96.
4Omran, AR. The epidemiologic transition. A theory of the epidemiology of population change. Milbank Mem. Fund Quart. 1971; 49(4): 509–38.
5Omran, AR. The epidemiologic transition theory. A preliminary update. J. Trop. Pediatr. 1983; 29: 305–16.
6Bobadilla, J, Frenk, J, Lozano, R, Frejka, T, Stern, C. The epidemiologic transition and health priorities. In: Jamison, D, ed. Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.
7Drewnowski, A, Popkin, BM. The nutrition transition: new trends in the global diet. Nutr. Rev. 1997; 55(2): 3143.
8Peña, M, Bacallao, J. Obesity and poverty: an emerging problem in the Americas. In: Peña, MaBJ, ed. Obesity and Poverty: A New Public Health Challenge. PAHO Scientific Publication No. 576. Washington, DC: Pan American Health Organization, 2000; 132.
9Barker, DJ. The intrauterine environment and adult cardiovascular disease. Ciba Foundation Symp. 1991; 156: 310.
10Barker, DJ. Fetal growth and adult disease. Br. J. Obstet. Gynaecol. 1992; 99(4): 275–6.
11Barker, DJ, Hales, CN, Fall, CH, Osmond, C, Phipps, K, Clark, PM. Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia (syndrome X): relation to reduced fetal growth. Diabetologia 1993; 36(1): 62–7.
12Barker, DJ, Martyn, CN, Osmond, C, Hales, CN, Fall, CH. Growth in utero and serum cholesterol concentrations in adult life. BMJ 1993; 307(6918): 1524–7.
13Phillips, DI, Hirst, S, Clark, PM, Hales, CN, Osmond, C. Fetal growth and insulin secretion in adult life. Diabetologia 1994; 37(6): 592–6.
14: Anon. Urbanization and public health. WHO Chronicle 1967; 21(10): 428–35.
15Popkin, BM. The nutrition transition in low-income countries: an emerging crisis. Nutr. Rev. 1994; 52(9): 285–98.
16Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)/World Health Organization (WHO). International Classification of Diseases, Revision 9 (ICD-9). Washington, DC: PAHO/WHO, 1978.
17World Health Organization (WHO). International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, ICD-10. Geneva: WHO, 1992.
18World Health Organization (WHO). World Health Statistics Annual. Geneva: WHO, 1999.
19Sepúlveda-Amor, J, Lezana, MA, Tapia-Conyer, R, Valdespino, JL, Madrigal, H, Kumate, J. Nutritional status of pre-school children and women in Mexico: results of a probabilistic national survey [in Spanish]. Gaceta Medica de Mexico 1990; 126(3): 207–24.
20Secretaría de Salud, Dirección de Epidemiología. Encuesta Nacional de Enfermedades Crónicas. Mexico DF: Secretaría de Salud, Dirección de Epidemiología, 1993.
21World Health Organization (WHO). Obesity. Preventing and Managing the Global Epidemic. Report of a WHO Consultation on Obesity, 06. Geneva: WHO, 1997.
22National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)/Centers for Disease Control (CDC). NCHS Growth Curves for Children, birth–18 y. Series 11, 165. DHEW Publication (PHS) 78 1650. Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 1978.
23Food and Nutrition Board Commission of Life Sciences, National Research Council. Recommended Dietary Allowances, 10th ed. Washington, DC: Subcommittee on the 10th edition of the RDAs, 1989.
24SPSS, Inc. SPSS for Windows, Release 10.0.0. Chicago, IL: SPSS Inc., 1999.
25Rivera, J, Long, K, Gónzalez-Cossío, T, Parra, S, Rivera, M, Rosado, J. Nutrición y Salud: Un Menú para la Familia. Cuadernos de Salud. Problemas Pretransicionales. Mexico: Secretaría de Salud, 1994.
26Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública (INSP). Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición 1999. Tomo I. Niños Menores de 5 años. Cuernavaca Morelos: INSP, 2000.
27Rivera-Dommarco, J, Shamah, T, Villalpando-Hernández, S, González de Cossío, T, Hernández-Prado, B, Sepúlveda, J. Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición 1999. Estado Nutricio en Niños y Mujeres en México. Cuernavaca Morelos: Instituo Nacional de Salvd Pública, 2001.
28Flores, M, Melgar, H, Cortes, C, Rivera, M, Rivera, J, Sepulveda, J. Consumo de energía y nutrimentos en mujeres mexicanas en edad reproductiva. Salud Pública de México 1998; 40: 161–71.
29Cuadernos de Salud. La Mortalidad en México: Registro, Estructura y Tendencias, 1st ed. Mexico: Secretaría de Salud, 1994.
30Secretaría de Salud. Mortalidad 1998. Contexto Actual y Aspectos Relevantes. Perfiles Estadísticos No. 13. Mexico: Dirección General de Estadística e Informática, 1999.
31Campirano, F, Barquera, S, Rivera, J, Hernández-Prado, B, Flóres-López, ML, Monterrubio, E. Estimation of energy under-reporting in obese and non-obese Mexican women using different equations: analysis of the Mexican National Nutrition Survey. Ann. Nutr. Metab 2001; 45(Suppl. 1): 146.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed