Skip to main content
×
Home

Increased exposure to community-based education and ‘below the line’ social marketing results in increased fruit and vegetable consumption

  • Colleen Glasson (a1), Kathy Chapman (a1), Tamara Wilson (a1), Kristi Gander (a1), Clare Hughes (a1), Nayerra Hudson (a1) and Erica James (a2)...
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To determine if localised programmes that are successful in engaging the community can add value to larger fruit and vegetable mass-media campaigns by evaluating the results of the Eat It To Beat It programme.

Design

The Eat It To Beat It programme is a multi-strategy intervention that uses community-based education and ‘below the line’ social marketing to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in parents. This programme was evaluated by a controlled before-and-after study with repeat cross-sectional data collected via computer-assisted telephone interviews with 1403 parents before the intervention (2008) and 1401 following intervention delivery (2011).

Setting

The intervention area was the Hunter region and the control area was the New England region of New South Wales, Australia.

Subjects

Parents of primary school-aged children (Kindergarten to Year 6).

Results

The programme achieved improvements in knowledge of recommended intakes for fruit and vegetables and some positive changes in knowledge of serving size for vegetables. Exposure to the programme resulted in a net increase of 0·5 servings of fruit and vegetables daily for those who recalled the programme compared with those who did not (P = 0·004). Increased intake of fruit and vegetables was significantly associated with increasing exposure to programme strategies.

Conclusions

The Eat It To Beat It programme demonstrates that an increase in consumption of fruit and vegetables can be achieved by programmes that build on the successes of larger mass-media and social-marketing campaigns. This suggests that funding for localised, community-based programmes should be increased.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Increased exposure to community-based education and ‘below the line’ social marketing results in increased fruit and vegetable consumption
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Increased exposure to community-based education and ‘below the line’ social marketing results in increased fruit and vegetable consumption
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Increased exposure to community-based education and ‘below the line’ social marketing results in increased fruit and vegetable consumption
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email colleenglasson@bigpond.com
References
Hide All
1.Begg S, Vos T, Barker Bet al. (2007) The Burden of Disease and Injury in Australia 2003. Canberra: AIHW.
2.Lichtenstein AH, Appel LJ, Brands Met al. (2006) Diet and lifestyle recommendations revision 2006: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Nutrition Committee. Circulation 114, 8296.
3.National Health and Medical Research Council (2013) Australian Dietary Guidelines. Canberra: NHMRC; available at http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/_files_nhmrc/publications/attachments/n55_australian_dietary_guidelines_0.pdf
4.World Health Organization (2003) Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Disease. Report of a Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation. WHO Technical Report Series no. 916. Geneva: WHO.
5.Khaw K-T, Bingham S, Welch Aet al. (2001) Relation between plasma ascorbic acid and mortality in men and women in EPIC-Norfolk prospective study: a prospective population study. Lancet 357, 657663.
6.He FJ, Nowson CA, Lucas Met al. (2007) Increased consumption of fruit and vegetables is related to a reduced risk of coronary heart disease: meta-analysis of cohort studies. J Hum Hypertens 21, 717728.
7.Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing (2008) Factsheet—Fruit and Vegetable Serves. http://www.health.gov.au/internet/healthyactive/publishing.nsf/Content/fact1 (accessed April 2012).
8.Centre for Epidemiology and Research (2010) 2009 Summary Report on Adult Health from the New South Wales Population Health Survey. http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/resources/publichealth/surveys/hsa_09summary.pdf (accessed April 2012).
9.Pomerleau J, Lock K, Knai Cet al. (2005) Interventions designed to increase adult fruit and vegetable intake can be effective: a systematic review of the literature. J Nutr 135, 24862495.
10.Snyder LB, Hamilton MA, Mitchell EWet al. (2004) A meta-analysis of the effect of mediated health communication campaigns on behavior change in the United States. J Health Commun 9, Suppl. 1, 7196.
11.Matson-Koffman DM, Brownstein JN, Neiner JAet al. (2005) A site-specific literature review of policy and environmental interventions that promote physical activity and nutrition for cardiovascular health: what works? Am J Health Promot 19, 167193.
12.Brownson RC, Haire-Joshu D & Luke DA (2006) Shaping the context of health: a review of environmental and policy approaches in the prevention of chronic diseases. Annu Rev Public Health 27, 341370.
13.Pollard CM, Miller MR, Daly AMet al. (2008) Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption: success of the Western Australian Go for 2&5 campaign. Public Health Nutr 11, 314320.
14.Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing (2008) Welcome to the Go for 2&5 Website. http://www.health.gov.au/internet/healthyactive/publishing.nsf/content/2and5 (accessed April 2012).
15.NSW Health, Cancer Institute of NSW (2007) Summary Report: Evaluation of the NSW Go for 2&5® Fruit and Vegetable Campaign. Sydney: NSW Health.
16.Elliott D & Walker D (2007) Evaluation of the National Go for 2&5® Campaign. Canberra: Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing; available at http://www.health.gov.au/internet/healthyactive/publishing.nsf/Content/EAED0B3283A8A1E2CA257259007CFC2D/$File/2&5-eval-jan06.pdf
17.Queensland Health (2010) The Health of Queenslanders 2010. Third Report of the Chief Health Officer Queensland. Brisbane: Queensland Health.
18.Wakefield MA, Loken B & Hornik RC (2010) Use of mass media campaigns to change health behaviour. Lancet 376, 12611271.
19.Moodie AR, Daube M, Carnell Ket al. (2009) Australia: the Healthiest Country by 2020. National Preventative Health Strategy – the Roadmap for Action. Canberra: Australian Government, Preventative Health Taskforce; available at http://www.preventativehealth.org.au
20.Carter SM (2003) Going below the line: creating transportable brands for Australia's dark market. Tob Control 12, Suppl. 3, iii87iii94.
21.Hunter New England Area Health Service (2009) Good for Kids. Good for Life. About us. http://www.goodforkids.nsw.gov.au/About_Us (accessed April 2012).
22.Hunter New England Area Health Service (2009) Good For Kids. Good for Life. Vegies – Serve ’em up! Campaign. http://www.goodforkids.nsw.gov.au/Parents/Vegies_Serve_em_up (accessed April 2012).
23.Eureka Strategic Research (2007) Influencing Food Purchasing Decisions. Sydney: Cancer Council NSW.
24.Van Duyn MA, Kristal AR, Dodd Ket al. (2001) Association of awareness, intrapersonal and interpersonal factors, and stage of dietary change with fruit and vegetable consumption: a national survey. Am J Health Promot 16, 6978.
25.Bandura A (1986) Social Foundations of Thought and Action: A Social Cognitive Theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
26.Green L & Kreuter M (1991) Health Promotion Planning: An Educational and Environmental Approach, 2nd ed. Mountain View, CA: Mayfield Publishing Company.
27.Prochaska JO & DiClemente CC (1983) Stages and processes of self-change of smoking: toward an integrative model of change. J Consult Clin Psychol 51, 390395.
28.Ma J, Betts NM, Horacek Tet al. (2003) Assessing stages of change for fruit and vegetable intake in young adults: a combination of traditional staging algorithms and food-frequency questionnaires. Health Educ Res 18, 224236.
29.Glasson C, Chapman K, Gander Ket al. (2012) The efficacy of a brief, peer-led nutrition education intervention in increasing fruit and vegetable consumption: a wait-list, community-based randomised controlled trial. Public Health Nutr 15, 13181326.
30.Atienza AA & King AC (2002) Community-based health intervention trials: an overview of methodological issues. Epidemiol Rev 24, 7279.
31.Merzel C & D'Afflitti J (2003) Reconsidering community-based health promotion: promise, performance, and potential. Am J Public Health 93, 557574.
32.Coyne T, Ibiebele TI, McNaughton Set al. (2004) Evaluation of brief dietary questions to estimate vegetable and fruit consumption – using serum carotenoids and red-cell folate. Public Health Nutr 8, 298308.
33.Greene GW, Fey-Yensan N, Padula Cet al. (2004) Differences in psychosocial variables by stage of change for fruits and vegetables in older adults. J Am Diet Assoc 104, 12361243.
34.Marks GC (2001) Monitoring Food Habits in the Australian Population Using Short Questions. Canberra: Australian Food and Nutrition Monitoring Unit.
35.Glasson C, Chapman K & James E (2010) Fruit and vegetables should be targeted separately in health promotion programmes: differences in consumption levels, barriers, knowledge and stages of readiness for change. Public Health Nutr 14, 694701.
36.Shaikh AR, Yaroch AL, Nebeling Let al. (2008) Psychosocial predictors of fruit and vegetable consumption in adults a review of the literature. Am J Prev Med 34, 535543.
37.Glanz K, Basil M, Maibach Eet al. (1998) Why Americans eat what they do: taste, nutrition, cost, convenience, and weight control concerns as influences on food consumption. J Am Diet Assoc 98, 11181126.
38.Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (2011) The Impact of Recent Flood Events on Commodities. Canberra: Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences.
39.Berry TR, Spence JC, Plotnikoff RCet al. (2009) A mixed methods evaluation of televised health promotion advertisements targeted at older adults. Eval Program Plann 32, 278288.
40.Ashfield-Watt P, Welch A, Godward Set al. (2007) Effect of a pilot community intervention on fruit and vegetable intakes: use of FACET (Five-a-day Community Evaluation Tool). Public Health Nutr 10, 671680.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 24
Total number of PDF views: 294 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 424 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 23rd November 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.