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    Altobelli, Emma Petrocelli, Reimondo Verrotti, Alberto Chiarelli, Francesco and Marziliano, Ciro 2015. Genetic and environmental factors affect the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Pediatric Diabetes, p. n/a.


    Nucci, Anita M. Virtanen, Suvi M. and Becker, Dorothy J. 2015. Infant Feeding and Timing of Complementary Foods in the Development of Type 1 Diabetes. Current Diabetes Reports, Vol. 15, Issue. 9,


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Infant feeding patterns in families with a diabetes history – observations from The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) birth cohort study

  • Sandra Hummel (a1) (a2), Kendra Vehik (a3), Ulla Uusitalo (a3), Wendy McLeod (a3), Carin Andrén Aronsson (a4), Nicole Frank (a5), Patricia Gesualdo (a5), Jimin Yang (a3), Jill M Norris (a6) and Suvi M Virtanen (a7) (a8) (a9) (a10)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980013003054
  • Published online: 27 November 2013
Abstract
AbstractObjective

To assess the association between diabetes family history and infant feeding patterns.

Design

Data on breast-feeding duration and age at first introduction of cow's milk and gluten-containing cereals were collected in 3-month intervals during the first 24 months of life.

Setting

Data from the multicentre TEDDY (The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young) study, including centres in the USA, Sweden, Finland and Germany.

Subjects

A total of 7026 children, including children with a mother with type 1 diabetes (T1D; n 292), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM; n 404) or without diabetes but with a father and/or sibling with T1D (n 464) and children without diabetes family history (n 5866).

Results

While exclusive breast-feeding ended earlier and cow's milk was introduced earlier in offspring of mothers with T1D and GDM, offspring of non-diabetic mothers but a father and/or sibling with T1D were exclusively breast-fed longer and introduced to cow's milk later compared with infants without diabetes family history. The association between maternal diabetes and shorter exclusive breast-feeding duration was attenuated after adjusting for clinical variables (delivery mode, gestational age, Apgar score and birth weight). Country-specific analyses revealed differences in these associations, with Sweden showing the strongest and Finland showing no association between maternal diabetes and breast-feeding duration.

Conclusions

Family history of diabetes is associated with infant feeding patterns; however, the associations clearly differ by country, indicating that cultural differences are important determinants of infant feeding behaviour. These findings need to be considered when developing strategies to improve feeding patterns in infants with a diabetes family history.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email sandra.hummel@lrz.uni-muenchen.de
Footnotes
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Members of the TEDDY Study Group are listed in the Appendix

Footnotes
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

5.S Hummel , C Winkler , S Schoen et al. (2007) Breast-feeding habits in families with type 1 diabetes. Diabet Med 24, 671676.

6.S Hummel , A Knopff , M Hummel et al. (2008) Breastfeeding in woman with gestational diabetes. Dtsch Med Wochenstr 133, 180184.

7.C Sparud-Lundin , M Wennergren , A Elfvin et al. (2011) Breastfeeding in women with type 1 diabetes: exploration of predictive factors. Diabetes Care 34, 296301.

8.S Sorkio , D Cuthbertson , S Bärlund et al. (2010) Breastfeeding patterns of mothers with type 1 diabetes: results from an infant feeding trial. Diabetes Metab Res Rev 26, 206211.

9.J Webster , K Moore & A McMullan (1995) Breastfeeding outcomes for women with insulin dependent diabetes. J Hum Lact 11, 195200.

10.E Stage , H Norgard , P Damm et al. (2006) Long-term breastfeeding in women with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Care 29, 771774.

11.M Pflüger , C Winkler , S Hummel et al. (2010) Early infant diet in children at high risk for type 1 diabetes. Horm Metab Res 42, 143148.

12.JM Norris , K Barriga , G Klingensmith et al. (2003) Timing of initial cereal exposure in infancy and risk of islet autoimmunity. JAMA 290, 17131720.

13.AG Ziegler , S Schmid , D Huber et al. (2003) Early gluten exposure is a risk factor for type 1 diabetes-associated autoimmunity. JAMA 290, 17211728.

14.SM Virtanen , MG Kenward , M Erkkola et al. (2006) Age at introduction of new foods and advanced beta cell autoimmunity in young children with HLA-conferred susceptibility of type 1 diabetes. Diabetologia 49, 15121521.

16.TEDDY Study Group (2008) The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) Study. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1150, 113.

17.M Knip , SM Virtanen , K Seppä et al. (2010) Dietary intervention in infancy and later signs of beta-cell autoimmunity. N Engl J Med 363, 19001908.

19.AE Baughcum , SB Johnson , SK Carmichael et al. (2005) Maternal efforts to prevent type 1 diabetes in at-risk children. Diabetes Care 28, 916921.

20.TRIGR Study Group, HK Akerblom , J Krischer , SM Virtanen et al. (2011) The Trial to Reduce IDDM in the Genetically at Risk (TRIGR) study: recruitment, intervention and follow-up. Diabetologia 54, 627633.

21.S Hummel , M Pflüger , M Hummel et al. (2011) Primary dietary intervention study to reduce the risk of islet autoimmunity in children at increased risk for type 1 diabetes: the BABYDIET study. Diabetes Care 34, 13011305.

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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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