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    Tang, Li Lee, Andy H. Binns, Colin W. Yang, Yuxiong Wu, Yan Li, Yanxia and Qiu, Liqian 2014. Widespread Usage of Infant Formula in China: A Major Public Health Problem. Birth, Vol. 41, Issue. 4, p. 339.


    Guo, Sufang Fu, Xulan Scherpbier, Robert W Wang, Yan Zhou, Hong Wang, Xiaoli and Hipgrave, David B 2013. Breastfeeding rates in central and western China in 2010: implications for child and population health. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, Vol. 91, Issue. 5, p. 322.


    Qiu, L. Binns, C.W. Zhao, Y. Zhang, K. and Xie, X. 2010. Hepatitis B and Breastfeeding in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People's Republic of China. Breastfeeding Medicine, Vol. 5, Issue. 3, p. 109.


    Tarrant, Roslyn C Younger, Katherine M Sheridan-Pereira, Margaret White, Martin J and Kearney, John M 2010. The prevalence and determinants of breast-feeding initiation and duration in a sample of women in Ireland. Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 13, Issue. 06, p. 760.


    Schulze, Pamela A. Zhao, Baomei and Young, Cathleen E. 2009. Beliefs About Infant Feeding in China and the United States: Implications for Breastfeeding Promotion. Ecology of Food and Nutrition, Vol. 48, Issue. 5, p. 345.


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Infant feeding practices in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, People's Republic of China

  • Fenglian Xu (a1), Colin Binns (a2), Jing Wu (a3), Re Yihan (a4), Yun Zhao (a2) and Andy Lee (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980007246750
  • Published online: 01 February 2007
Abstract
AbstractAims

To document infant feeding methods in the first six months of life in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, People's Republic of China, 2003–2004. Some problems with breast-feeding in the area are explained.

Methods

A longitudinal study of infant feeding practices was undertaken. A total of 1219 mothers who delivered babies during 2003 and 2004 were interviewed in five hospitals or institutes, and after discharge were contacted in person or by telephone at approximately monthly intervals to obtain details of infant feeding practices. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to explore factors associated with breast-feeding initiation.

Results

‘Any breast-feeding’ rates at discharge and at 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5 and 6 months were 92.2, 91.3, 89.9, 88.8, 87.7, 86.0 and 73.0%, respectively. ‘Exclusive breast-feeding’ rates at discharge and at 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5 and 6 months were 66.2, 47.6, 30.1, 25.8, 22.1, 13.0 and 6.2%, respectively. The main problem of breast-feeding in Xinjiang was the early introduction of formula or water. The average duration of ‘exclusive breast-feeding’ was 1.8 months (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7–2.0), of ‘full breast-feeding’ 2.8 months (95% CI 2.7–2.9) and of ‘any breast-feeding’ 5.3 months (95% CI 5.2–5.4).

Conclusions

Infant feeding methods in Xinjiang were documented in this study and the main problems with infant feeding in Xinjiang are discussed. Further studies are needed to identify factors associated with ‘exclusive breast-feeding’ and duration.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email c.binns@curtin.edu.au
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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
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