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    Csizmadi, Ilona Kelemen, Linda E. Speidel, Thomas Yuan, Yan Dale, Laura C. Friedenreich, Christine M. and Robson, Paula J. 2014. Are Physical Activity Levels Linked to Nutrient Adequacy? Implications for Cancer Risk. Nutrition and Cancer, Vol. 66, Issue. 2, p. 214.


    Kwan, Marilyn L. Greenlee, Heather Lee, Valerie S. Castillo, Adrienne Gunderson, Erica P. Habel, Laurel A. Kushi, Lawrence H. Sweeney, Carol Tam, Emily K. and Caan, Bette J. 2011. Multivitamin use and breast cancer outcomes in women with early-stage breast cancer: the Life After Cancer Epidemiology study. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Vol. 130, Issue. 1, p. 195.


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Multivitamin supplement use and risk of invasive breast cancer

  • Johanna M Meulepas (a1) (a2), Polly A Newcomb (a2) (a3), Andrea N Burnett-Hartman (a2) (a4), John M Hampton (a3) (a5) and Amy Trentham-Dietz (a3) (a5)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980009992187
  • Published online: 03 December 2009
Abstract
AbstractObjective

Multivitamin supplements are used by nearly half of middle-aged women in the USA. Despite this high prevalence of multivitamin use, little is known about the effects of multivitamins on health outcomes, including cancer risk. Our main objective was to determine the association between multivitamin use and the risk of breast cancer in women.

Design

We conducted a population-based case–control study among 2968 incident breast cancer cases (aged 20–69 years), diagnosed between 2004 and 2007, and 2982 control women from Wisconsin, USA. All participants completed a structured telephone interview which ascertained supplement use prior to diagnosis, demographics and risk factor information. Odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals were calculated using multivariable logistic regression.

Results

Compared with never users of multivitamins, the OR for breast cancer was 1·02 (95 % CI 0·87, 1·19) for current users and 0·99 (95 % CI 0·74, 1·33) for former users. Further, neither duration of use (for ≥10 years: OR = 1·13, 95 % CI 0·93, 1·38, P for trend = 0·25) nor frequency (>7 times/week: OR = 1·00, 95 % CI 0·77, 1·28, P for trend = 0·97) was related to risk in current users. Stratification by menopausal status, family history of breast cancer, age, alcohol, tumour staging and postmenopausal hormone use did not significantly modify the association between multivitamin use and breast cancer.

Conclusions

The current study found no association between multivitamin supplement use and breast cancer risk in women.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Email pnewcomb@fhcrc.org
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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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