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The vitamin D requirement during human lactation: the facts and IOM's ‘utter’ failure

  • Bruce W. Hollis (a1) and Carol L. Wagner (a1)
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Abstract
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References
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1.Institute of Medicine (2011) Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin D and Calcium. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
2.Food and Nutrition Board, Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes (1997) Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Fluoride. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
3.Hollis, B, Roos, B & Lambert, P (1981) Vitamin D and its metabolites in human and bovine milk. J Nutr 111, 12401248.
4.Blumberg, R, Forbes, G & Fraser, D (1963) The prophylactic requirement and the toxicity of vitamin D. Pediatrics 31, 512525.
5.Lakdawala, DR & Widdowson, EM (1977) Vitamin D in human milk. Lancet 1, 167168.
6.Hollis, B, Roos, B, Drapper, H et al. (1981) Occurrence of vitamin D sulfate in human milk whey. J Nutr 111, 384390.
7.Hollis, BW (1983) Individual quantitation of vitamin D2, vitamin D3, 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 in human milk. Anal Biochem 131, 211219.
8.Greer, FR, Hollis, BW, Cripps, DJ et al. (1984) Effects of maternal ultraviolet B irradiation on vitamin D content of human milk. J Pediatr 105, 431433.
9.Greer, FR, Hollis, BW & Napoli, JL (1984) High concentrations of vitamin D2 in human milk associated with pharmacologic doses of vitamin D2. J Pediatr 105, 6164.
10.Vieth, R, Chan, PC & MacFarlane, GD (2001) Efficacy and safety of vitamin D3 intake exceeding the lowest observed adverse effect level. Am J Clin Nutr 73, 288294.
11.Matsuoka, LY, Wortsman, J, Haddad, JG et al. (1989) In vivo threshold for cutaneous synthesis of vitamin D3. J Lab Clin Med 114, 301305.
12.Haddad, JG, Matsuoka, LY, Hollis, BW et al. (1993) Human plasma transport of vitamin D after its endogenous synthesis. J Clin Invest 91, 25522555.
13.Hollis, BW, Pittard, WB & Reinhardt, TA (1986) Relationships among vitamin D, 25(OH)D, and vitamin D-binding protein concentrations in the plasma and milk of human subjects. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 62, 4144.
14.Wagner, C, Hulsey, T, Fanning, D et al. (2006) High dose vitamin D3 supplementation in a cohort of breastfeeding mothers and their infants: a six-month follow-up pilot study. Breastfeed Med 2, 5970.
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Public Health Nutrition
  • ISSN: 1368-9800
  • EISSN: 1475-2727
  • URL: /core/journals/public-health-nutrition
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